Gray whale has been spotted off the coast of Pacific Beach

first_img Mike McKinnon III, Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Updated: 11:53 AM Mike McKinnon III PACIFIC BEACH (KUSI) – A whale has been spotted off the coast of Pacific Beach…Dolphins have been spotted swimming in the area as wellcenter_img Posted: February 27, 2019 Gray whale has been spotted off the coast of Pacific Beach February 27, 2019last_img

OEA Webinar to Highlight Defense Spending by State Report

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR After increasing by more than 65 percent from fiscal 2000 to 2010, defense spending is expected to decline by 28 percent from FY 2011 to 2019 in real terms, according to a report from DOD’s Office of Economic Adjustment (OEA) examining defense spending at the state and local levels in FY 2014.On Wednesday from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., the agency will hold a webinar on the report, featuring Christine Chmura, CEO, chief economist and principal at Chmura Economics and Analytics, which prepared the report. To register for the event, visit the OEA website.The report highlights factors, such as the regional expenditures from military bases or private contractors, which can be used by state and local officials to assess their region’s vulnerability to projected declines in defense spending. The impact of DOD spending cuts has been uneven across states, as it depends in part on the number of personnel and the amount of contract revenue in each state, according to the report.Overall, defense spending is accounting for a smaller portion of state economies as the military draws down from two overseas conflicts and the 2011 Budget Control Act imposes stringent spending caps.For further information about the webinar, contact Elizabeth Chimienti at elizabeth.a.chimienti.civ@mail.mil.last_img read more

The Lenovo Smart Clock The smartest alarm clock for your nightstand

first_imgChris Monroe/CNET The Lenovo Smart Clock is now shipping out to customers. Developed alongside Google, it’s a bedside alarm clock that responds to voice commands through Google Assistant. It has a simple touchscreen so you can check your calendar and the weather when you first wake up.Because it was developed with Google, it was obviously meant to coexist with the Google Nest Hub (formerly the Google Home Hub) in Google’s smart home product line. The Nest Hub is a smart display with a more robust touchscreen that can play videos, show you pictures and do lots of other tasks that the Lenovo Smart Clock can’t.The Nest Hub retails for $130 and the Lenovo Smart Clock for $80, but the Nest Hub is frequently on sale for even less than the retail price of the Lenovo Smart Clock. In that case, it can be hard to justify spending roughly the same amount on a device with a less capable touchscreen.See it at WalmartNote that CNET may get a share of the revenue if you buy anything featured on our site.In my review, I mentioned this as one of the downsides of the Lenovo Smart Clock. You shouldn’t buy it expecting all of the same features as a full-sized smart display. You’ll be disappointed. That said, the Lenovo Smart Clock is unique enough to stand on its own and it’s generally a better gadget if you specifically want a smart gadget for your bedside table. Here’s why.Tech detoxThe Lenovo Smart Clock is a better fit if you want to get away from your phone before bed. The Nest Hub can’t do everything you can do on a phone, but you can still use it to watch YouTube videos and scroll through images. See All Aug 30 • Battling bot vacs: iRobot Roomba S9+ vs Neato Botvac D7 Connected Lenovo Smart Clock: Google Assistant and Lenovo combine… Now playing: Watch this: CNET Smart Home 12 Photos Your alarm can trigger your good morning routine, which will tell you about your calendar and play the news by default. You can also customize the routine to control your smart home devices and more in the Google Home app. This routine won’t trigger when you snooze, just when you stop your alarm for good.My favorite feature of the bunch is the sunrise function. Turn this on, and the screen on the Lenovo Smart Clock will gradually start getting brighter 30 minutes before your scheduled alarm. This wake-up light serves to naturally ease you out of your sleep leading up to your wake-up time and it works great. The Nest Hub could potentially add this feature in a future update, but right now, the Lenovo Clock has it and the Nest Hub doesn’t.Smack to snoozelenovo-smart-clock-7 Chris Monroe/CNET When your alarm does start buzzing, you can smack the top of the Lenovo Smart Clock to get it to stop. You can customize this so that hitting it will cause it to snooze or stop entirely, which is pretty great. If you use the Nest Hub as an alarm, you can stop it just by saying “Stop” or you can hit a snooze button on the touchscreen. Neither is an arduous task, and you have those options with the Lenovo Clock too. When I’m groggy in the morning, I get a lot of satisfaction from stopping my alarm with a little bit of brute force.I almost always hit snooze a couple of times and finding a button on the Nest Hub’s screen is honestly more work than I want when I’m still struggling to wake up. Smacking the top of the Lenovo Smart Clock feels right — a call back to a big snooze button on the top of a traditional alarm clock. The fact that you can customize what happens when you hit it makes it even better.Sound qualityBelieve it or not, the little Lenovo Smart Clock sounds better when it’s playing music than the Nest Hub. The Nest Hub isn’t exactly a giant device and neither one can do more than fill a room with background music, but Lenovo makes great use of its built-in 3W speaker and two passive radiators.It sounds pretty good, especially for its size, and doesn’t have any noticeable distortion in sound quality, even at max volume. Again, don’t expect booming stereo sound — Lenovo’s alarm clock is tiny — but it’s good enough to outclass the tinny and underwhelming sound quality of the Nest Hub.Fits in better Smart Home 14 Photos I love the cute and colorful design of the Nest Hub. It could blend into a wide variety of rooms and Google offers a few color choices for the fabric exterior. The Lenovo Smart Clock just has the one grey fabric finish, but it’s perfect for your nightstand.Neither has a built-in camera and both have a mute switch to help with peace of mind. Plus, they both have an ambient light sensor to minimize glow from the display. But Lenovo’s alarm clock is small enough to fit onto any open surface in your bedroom. It has a USB port for charging your phone and the rectangular front is pleasantly reminiscent of old school alarms with a modern twist.Nevertheless, wait for a saleThe Google Nest Hub is a great smart display. The Lenovo Smart Clock is a great smart alarm clock. Both are helpful smart home gadgets. Yes, they both have Google Assistant built in for voice control and the screen on the Nest Hub does more, but the Lenovo Smart Clock is perfectly suited for what it is. If you specifically want to upgrade your alarm clock with smarts, this cute little gadget from Lenovo is your best option right now.With that said, the frequent sales on the Nest Hub make the Lenovo Smart Clock seem overpriced. Its more limited functionality makes a lot more sense when it’s $50 less than the Nest Hub. Lenovo’s full-sized smart display has also gone on sale a few times since it was released last year, and your best bet might be to wait for a similar sale on the Lenovo Smart Clock. Once it’s discounted, if you don’t need all of the features of the Nest Hub, you can save money by going with the more streamlined bedside gadget. Aug 31 • Best smart light bulbs for 2019 (plus switches, light strips, accessories and more) News • The Lenovo Smart Clock can now double as a digital photo frame Smart displays let Amazon, Facebook, Google show you answers to your questions • Lenovo Smart Clock Aug 31 • The best coffee grinders you can buy right now The Lenovo Smart Clock is closer in functionality to a smart speaker as the touchscreen only offers a few prescribed functions while still letting you issue any of Google Assistant’s recognized voice commands. For certain families, that more limited functionality will be a good thing.If you want to limit screen time for yourself and your family, the Lenovo Smart Clock offers a viable alternative. You can still see the most pressing pieces of info — you can check on your security cam, look at your calendar, and see the forecast and your commute.Lenovo was intentional with the features left out of the Smart Clock. What remains makes sense for your bedside and for the things you need to know when you’re going to sleep or first waking up. It offers enough info that you could reasonably turn off your phone without the temptation to keep consuming the vast content of the internet anyway.Sunrise alarmsYou can set an alarm with a voice command to the Google Nest Hub, so you can use it to wake you up, but the Lenovo Smart Clock is designed for that task. It will suggest alarms based on your first appointment the next day. You can set multiple alarms and customize each one. You can change the alarm tones, the snooze length and the volume of the alarm (separate from the volume of the speaker). The Lenovo Smart Clock helps Google Assistant ease you out of sleep Share your voice Tags reading • The Lenovo Smart Clock: The smartest alarm clock for your nightstand Review • The Lenovo Smart Clock: A deft, Google Assistant-powered twist on the simple alarm clock 3:14 Comments Nest Google Lenovo 2 CNET Smart Home Aug 31 • Alexa can tell you if someone breaks into your houselast_img read more

Mandelas legacy cherished by some challenged by others

first_imgNelson Mandela. Photo: WikipediaA black and white photo of Nelson Mandela in boxing attire greets visitors to the gym where the liberation hero trained in the 1950s before delivering the knock-out blow to apartheid decades later.“He used to train here, I feel strong… Physically and mentally I get some strength,” said gym-goer Kgotso Phali, 18.The red and white walls of the gym, located in South Africa’s Soweto township, smell of fresh paint.The Donaldson Orlando Community Centre (DOCC) has been restored to its former glory to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Mandela’s birth.Mandela, South Africa’s first black president known locally by his clan name “Madiba”, died in 2013.“People had to carry passes-all these things are gone now. We are free,” thanks to him, said Andy Zameko, who said he was proud to work out in the same gym as Mandela.Mandela would visit the gym several times a week to train and forget the ordeal that was the fight against the white supremacist regime.“The walls of… the DOCC are drenched with sweet memories that will delight me for years,” Mandela wrote to his daughter Zindzi from his cell on Robben Island where he was imprisoned for 18 years.A copy of the letter, dated 9 December, 1979, is displayed on a wall in the gym.Nearby, young musicians seek to catch the attention of passing tourists in front of Mandela’s former home which has been transformed into a museum.“(He) makes us united. Now we are all united. (Blacks) can perform in theatres like the Joburg Theatre now-it was not the case before,” said guitarist Vincent Ncabashe, 49.‘Not living his dream’Others recognise the achievement but are disappointed in the post-apartheid reality.“Madiba is so inspiring for me,” said hip-hop singer Thobane Mkhize who sported a striking bouffant haircut.“But we are not living his dream,” said the 24-year-old musician.“The parliament is like a (sitcom), it is no longer a parliament because politicians are busy with corruption. Instead of being united, we are busy looking at the colours of the skin,” he added.“There was need for a figure to reconcile black and whites,” said Genevieve Assamoi, a 45-year-old from Ivory Coast.“He was crucial in ensuring that blacks did not take revenge on whites and to allow the whites to feel safe.”“Without him, we would still be stuck in the same place,” said policeman and father-of-three Mpho Ngobeni.‘He did his best’At a nearby petrol station in Soweto, two white men in khaki outfits completed the purchase of a car from two young black men-an unusual scene in the sprawling black-majority township.“The white people also got a chance (to stay in South Africa),” said Kaelen Viljoen as he struggled to hide the handgun clipped to his belt.The 22-year-old had also brought along a baseball bat, perched on the front seat of his 4X4.“I always have a weapon with me and I would not have left it at home when I came here,” said Viljoen, visiting Soweto for the first time in his life.“We called a lot of guys and we were very worried to come here, because he said there are a lot of black people here, and white people driving around here, is going to be a big problem.“(But) after we met the guys we bought the car from, we actually love it, they are very friendly.”Maxwell Huis, 44, a homeless father-of-two said the reality delivered by Mandela was starkly different to that which he had promised.“He sold the black people to the whites. There should have been a civil war-it would have changed things,” he added as he foraged for wood to burn.Mtate Phakela, 19, sees Mandela’s legacy very differently.“He gave us a revolution without a war. He gave us the idea of freedom through peace,” said the teenager.“But we are not economically free.”Economic divisions still plague the country with the median monthly salary for whites at around 10,000 rands ($753, 638 euros) but just 2,800 for the black community.“He did his best,” continued Mtate. “The people who came after could have done better to free us economically.”last_img read more

Black Candidates Are Missing in Ward 6 DC Council Race

first_imgBy James Wright, Special to the AFRO, jwright@afro.comOne of the District of Columbia’s most active political and cultural wards has a Black population over one-third and yet there are no Black candidates for that council seat this year.Ward 6 encompasses the U.S. Capitol, the popular Eastern Market, gentrifying Shaw and the booming Southwest Waterfront that includes the Nationals Major League Baseball Stadium. It is 51 percent White, 35 percent Black and the rest Latino and others. The ward is represented by Charles Allen (D), who is White, and he believes his jurisdiction has matured beyond voting for candidates based solely on race.Charles Allen represents Ward 6 on the D.C. Council. (Courtesy Photo)“I appreciate the strong African-American leadership that is in my ward,” Allen told the AFRO. “As a council member, I am supposed to represent all of my constituents regardless of their race and deal with issues that matter to all residents.”Allen has supported strong criminal justice reform on the council, making the system more humane for juvenile offenders, and wants more affordable housing in the District and modernizing school buildings. “These are issues that resonate for all Ward 6 residents and for working families and that includes African-American families,” he said.Allen is seeking re-election to a second term on the D.C. Council and faces one opponent, Lisa Hunter in the June 19 Democratic primary. Allen will face a Republican, Mike Bekesha, in the Nov. 6 general election.Hunter, who is part Jewish and part Latina, told the AFRO she will focus on affordable housing, job training and attainment and improving access to the District’s maternal and prenatal care system for African Americans in Ward 6.African-American Nadine Winter (D) was elected as the first Ward 6 council member in 1974 and she served until 1991 when she was defeated by another African American, Harold Brazil (D). Brazil ran for an at-large position on the council in 1996 and served in that capacity until 2005.When Brazil was elected at-large, his Ward 6 position was won by Sharon Ambrose, the first White woman to hold the position. Ambrose was followed by Tommy Wells (D) and Allen, who was elected in 2014.In 2014, Allen defeated African-American Darrel Thompson in the Democratic Primary. Thompson chose not to seek a rematch this year but said the lack of a Black candidate is less a matter of race than an issue of getting involved in the political process.“If people want to run for political office, they should run regardless of race,” Thompson told the AFRO. “It is good when people of different backgrounds become candidates. It makes the political process competitive and the voting public is exposed to a full range of ideas.”Francis Campbell, a former advisory neighborhood commissioner in Ward 6, told the AFRO he hasn’t decided who he will support for the Ward 6 position. “Many of the newer residents of the ward, who tend to be White, aren’t cognizant of the contributions of the long-term residents,” he said. In District lingo, older residents tend to mean Blacks and newer mean White and younger.Campbell said when his Black neighbors go to meetings in the ward they become frustrated when there is talk about dog parks and not about economic development and public safety issues that should be addressed. In some ways, Campbell doesn’t blame the new residents entirely. “The new residents do have more resources and the African Americans in the ward aren’t as cohesive as they should be,” he said.last_img read more

Conviction That Led to Chiefs Firing Overturned

first_imgBy Stephen Janis, Special to the AFROIn December of 2015, Pocomoke city resident Gerry Fitch was summoned from her jail cell in the Worcester County Detention Center by investigators for Maryland State Prosecutor Emmet Davitt.Fitch was serving time for drug possession.  So, she was uncertain as to why detectives who normally probe corruption with the state officials were interested in speaking to her.But when they started asking her about an alleged relationship with the former and first African-American chief of Pocomoke City, Kelvin Sewell, she said she was confused.Kelvin Sewell, a former Baltimore homicide detective, was fired when he was police chief of Pocomoke City in Worcester County, Md. The Maryland Court of Appeals recently overturned the conviction in a case in 2016 that led to his firing. (AFRO Photo)“It was an urban myth, they said, that I was supposedly pregnant by chief Sewell when I was arrested,” Fitch said in an interview with the Real News Network.“But It wasn’t true.”The interview was part of a wide-ranging investigation against Sewell after he was fired by the Pocomoke city council without explanation.The ongoing saga added a new twist last week, when the Maryland Court of special appeals overturned his conviction of misconduct in office by a Worcester jury in 2016.The charges were brought by Davitt based upon an investigation of a 2014 accident involving two parked cars in which prosecutors convinced a nearly all-White jury Sewell should have charged the driver.But in an opinion issued Nov. 29, the court ruled that Worcester County judge’s decision to bar Sewell from calling expert witnesses prejudiced the jury.In an explosive dissenting opinion Judge Dan Friedman said there was not enough evidence to prove Sewell had committed misconduct, and state prosecutor Emmet Davitt should be barred from trying to case again.“It is my view that the State has failed to prove any intent at all, let alone a corrupt one,” Friedman wrote.Despite the setback, in an email to the AFRO, Davitt said his office is more than likely to retry the case.“After reviewing the appellate court decision and speaking to the victims of the accident, it is very likely that we will retry case. Just need to double check availability and status of witnesses,” Davitt said.However, he would not commit or confirm on Fitch’s recounting of her encounter investigators.The possibility that Davitt may retry the case prompted criticism from State Senator Jill P. Carter.“The entire case smacks of racism and retaliation.  I hope the state prosecutor will not expend any more state funds trying to secure a conviction on such flimsy evidence,” State Senator Jill P. Carter told the AFRO.The court’s high-profile decision casts doubt on an investigation into Sewell, which initiated after he had filed EEOC complaints against the city of Pocomoke and Worcester County State’s Attorneys’ office. It also adds weight to the accusations of retaliation that have surfaced since Sewell was fired by the Pocomoke City Council in 2015 after he refused to terminate two Black officers who had also filed EEOC complaints.State Prosecutor Emmet Davitt indicted Sewell in 2016 for failing to charge a driver who had struck two parked cars in 2014.The charges allege Sewell had failed to cite Pocomoke resident Doug Matthews for leaving the scene of an accident. Prosecutors alleged Sewell had let Matthews go because both were members of an African-American Masons chapter on the Eastern Shore.But the court ruled that Sewell and Matthew’s membership “was not competent to prove that Sewell acted with corrupt intent.”  A lack of evidence the judges argued made the expert witness testimony critical to Sewell’s case.During the trial Sewell sought to call two policing experts to refute Davitt’s assertion his decision to charge Matthews was unusual. But the judge ruled that expert testimony would confuse the jury and barred Sewell from calling them.But a main point of contention during the trial was the involvement of the Worcester County State’s Attorney’s office in the investigation.  In court filings Sewell’s attorneys argued the case was retaliation for filing EEOC discrimination complaints against Worcester County.As proof, his defense cited emails between Davitt’s office and Worcester County prosecutors which revealed the case against Sewell originated with the same Worcester County agency he had filed an EEOC complaint against.The murky origin of the charges and the court’s decision is already prompting calls for Davitt to drop the case.One group, The Caucus of African-American Leaders, plans to send an open letter to Davitt asking him not to retry the case.“What we hope would look at the entire the circumstance and take into account that race and racism has played a factor in this case and they will drop the case as a result of it,” said Carl Snowden, who works with the group.(full disclosure this reporter co-wrote a book with Sewell).last_img read more