Dejan Lovren ready for tough England test

first_imgCroatia defender Dejan Lovren insists he is ready for a fiery clash against England on Sunday.The Three Lions host Croatia in their final group game of the UEFA Nations League and a victory against the World Cup runners-up will guarantee a place in next summer’s semi-finals.The Liverpool defender was part of Croatia’s squad throughout their impressive run to the final of this summer’s World Cup in Russia.Both teams know a win at on Sunday will see them top League A’s Group 4 and advance to the next stage, and Lovren is relishing the prospect of coming up against Gareth Southgate’s side.“It’s a final against England, so of course we will be strong,” he was quoted as saying by The Daily Mirror.“I think it will be a fiery game against them – they know us and what they can expect from us, and we will not run away from that.”Jadon Sancho, Borussia DortmundCrouch: Liverpool could beat Man United to Jadon Sancho Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Peter Crouch wouldn’t be surprised to see Jadon Sancho end up at Liverpool one day instead of his long-term pursuers Manchester United.“I love playing against England. I know the players in the Premier League and I have competed against them.”England and Croatia met earlier in the Nations League as they played out a 0-0 draw last month in Rijeka, and Lovren feels recent history will give Zlatko Dalic’s men plenty of belief.“People criticise me, but they didn’t say much when England didn’t score against us in the last game,” he said.“They will have extra motivation after the World Cup, but I think we will be brave.”“It will not be a friendly. We have beaten Spain and we want to win it now.”Spain will top the group, should England and Croatia play out a draw on Sunday night.last_img read more

US interfaith leaders demand sanction on Myanmar

first_imgA group of Rohingya refugee people walk in the water after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border in Teknaf. ReutersA number of US interfaith leaders on Wednesday called upon the international community to impose full sanctions on Myanmar until it stops what they said the textbook case of genocide against Rohingyas and restore citizenship of its displaced Muslim minority, reports UNB.They also called upon the world leaders to stand in solidarity with Rohingyas and invoke the convention for the prevention and punishment of genocide to protect the Rohingyas from persecution.At a press conference held at a city hotel after their recent visit to Rohingya camps in Cox’s Bazar, the American Buddhist, Jewish, Christian and Muslim community leaders praised Bangladesh’s humanitarian assistance and provision of security to the Rohingyas.They also endorsed prime minister Sheikh Hasina’s call that Rohingyas restored in their land in Myanmar with clear mandate for the UN to defend Rohingyas and bring the perpetrators of these crime to justice.Noor Ankis, 25, whose husband Ayub, a leader of the unregistered makeshift camp in Kutupalong, was killed late last month, poses for a picture with her two children in Cox’s Bazar. ReutersA 14-member delegation of American interfaith leaders, including that of two Buddhists, two Jews, two Muslim Imams and several Christians, earlier visited the Rohingya camps and listened to Rohingya voices. The visit was arranged by ‘Interfaith Coalition to Stop Genocide in Burma’.Upon getting back to the USA, they said, they will amplify Rohingya voices in the US Congress, administration and the civil society to mobilise public opinion across the globe to resolve the crisis and ensure safe return of Rohingyas to their mother land with security, dignity, rights and citizenship.Speaking at the press conference, a leading Buddhist American scholar Alan Senauke said what he saw at Balukhali Rohingya camp and heard the stories of the persecuted people make his heart weep. “Violence that directed against children, women, men and the families is the worst form of cruelty. To my understanding, the murder and displacement of Rohingyas in Myanmar has nothing to do with the Buddha’s teaching.”He also called upon the Buddhists around the world to stand with Rohingyas’ cry for safety, justice and citizenship. “We’re greatly disturbed by what many see as slander and distortion of the Buddha’s teaching.”Alan Senauke also said the hatred, systematic persecution and ethnic cleansing of Rohingyas stand in stark contradiction to monastic precepts and Buddha’s teaching on universal morality, peace and tolerance.He said they will raise fund in the USA to drum up support from Buddhists to stand by Rohingyas and raise voice for ensuring their security, justice and citizenship.Rabbi David Saperstein, a Jewish leader and immediate past US Ambassador at Large for religious freedom, said religious persecution was central component of the increasingly harsh oppression of the Rohingyas over the past decades.”We’ve heard the stories of mothers, fathers, brothers and sisters of watching how their family members were killed in front of them, and how they faced persecution,” he said.The Jewish leader said they will try to encourage the American authorities and international community to take the right step so that they Rohingyas can return to their country with protection and rights, including religious freedom.last_img read more

Black Candidates Are Missing in Ward 6 DC Council Race

first_imgBy James Wright, Special to the AFRO, jwright@afro.comOne of the District of Columbia’s most active political and cultural wards has a Black population over one-third and yet there are no Black candidates for that council seat this year.Ward 6 encompasses the U.S. Capitol, the popular Eastern Market, gentrifying Shaw and the booming Southwest Waterfront that includes the Nationals Major League Baseball Stadium. It is 51 percent White, 35 percent Black and the rest Latino and others. The ward is represented by Charles Allen (D), who is White, and he believes his jurisdiction has matured beyond voting for candidates based solely on race.Charles Allen represents Ward 6 on the D.C. Council. (Courtesy Photo)“I appreciate the strong African-American leadership that is in my ward,” Allen told the AFRO. “As a council member, I am supposed to represent all of my constituents regardless of their race and deal with issues that matter to all residents.”Allen has supported strong criminal justice reform on the council, making the system more humane for juvenile offenders, and wants more affordable housing in the District and modernizing school buildings. “These are issues that resonate for all Ward 6 residents and for working families and that includes African-American families,” he said.Allen is seeking re-election to a second term on the D.C. Council and faces one opponent, Lisa Hunter in the June 19 Democratic primary. Allen will face a Republican, Mike Bekesha, in the Nov. 6 general election.Hunter, who is part Jewish and part Latina, told the AFRO she will focus on affordable housing, job training and attainment and improving access to the District’s maternal and prenatal care system for African Americans in Ward 6.African-American Nadine Winter (D) was elected as the first Ward 6 council member in 1974 and she served until 1991 when she was defeated by another African American, Harold Brazil (D). Brazil ran for an at-large position on the council in 1996 and served in that capacity until 2005.When Brazil was elected at-large, his Ward 6 position was won by Sharon Ambrose, the first White woman to hold the position. Ambrose was followed by Tommy Wells (D) and Allen, who was elected in 2014.In 2014, Allen defeated African-American Darrel Thompson in the Democratic Primary. Thompson chose not to seek a rematch this year but said the lack of a Black candidate is less a matter of race than an issue of getting involved in the political process.“If people want to run for political office, they should run regardless of race,” Thompson told the AFRO. “It is good when people of different backgrounds become candidates. It makes the political process competitive and the voting public is exposed to a full range of ideas.”Francis Campbell, a former advisory neighborhood commissioner in Ward 6, told the AFRO he hasn’t decided who he will support for the Ward 6 position. “Many of the newer residents of the ward, who tend to be White, aren’t cognizant of the contributions of the long-term residents,” he said. In District lingo, older residents tend to mean Blacks and newer mean White and younger.Campbell said when his Black neighbors go to meetings in the ward they become frustrated when there is talk about dog parks and not about economic development and public safety issues that should be addressed. In some ways, Campbell doesn’t blame the new residents entirely. “The new residents do have more resources and the African Americans in the ward aren’t as cohesive as they should be,” he said.last_img read more

Thousand pledge to donate eyes

first_imgKolkata: One thousand people have pledged to donate their eyes during the national eye donation fortnight which concluded on Saturday.The camps were organised by Medical Bank. Bengal ranks 7th in the country in eye donation. In 2017-18, 3,800 eyes were collected from the donors.D Ashis, secretary of Medical Bank, urged the state government to set up eye banks in the districts. “People could not donate their eyes due to lack of facility in the districts.” It may be noted that recently donation of organs of patients, who died in hospitals following the initiative taken by their relatives and parents, has given new lease of lives to patients suffering from kidney and heart related ailments.last_img read more

Tamang files nomination as Independent candidate

first_imgDarjeeling: Former GTA chairman Binay Tamang filed his nomination as an Independent candidate backed by the GJM (Binay Tamang faction) and the Trinamool Congress, for the Darjeeling Assembly by-election.Incidentally, the Calcutta High Court had ruled on Wednesday that both the Binay and Bimal factions of GJM can field candidates for the elections, but the candidates will have to contest as Independents. A GJM-TMC road show with Tamang culminated near the District Collectorate in Darjeeling, following which he filed his nomination. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataLater while talking to media persons, Tamang said: “I am no more a Chowkidar (guard). Many have claimed that in greed of the chair. On Thursday, I resigned from the capacity of chairman, Board of Administrators, GTA, for the benefit of the Hill masses.” Tamang stated that in his 17 months in office, he realised that there were many problems that plagued the Hills. “Out of these problems we sorted many out but we also realised that many were not within our jurisdiction and required intervention of the state government. It is then we realised that coordination and sound relation with the state government is required for the Hills to progress. Owing to this, my party decided that I should contest. I will be the bridge between the Hills and the state government,” he added. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateHe said issues like handing out land documents (patta) and filling up vacancies in the GTA and government offices would require the state government’s intervention. “87.2% people in the Hills do not have land documents. If elected, I will work to ensure that people living in tea gardens, cinchona plantations, DI fund land and forest villages all get pattas,” assured Tamang. It may be recalled that TMC supremo Mamata Banerjee, while addressing a campaign rally at Suri on Thursday, had stated that the party will extend full support to Tamang. Meanwhile, GNLF spokesperson Niraj Zimba has been fielded as the BJP candidate. He will be backed by GNLF and the Bimal faction of GJM.last_img read more