OEA Webinar to Highlight Defense Spending by State Report

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR After increasing by more than 65 percent from fiscal 2000 to 2010, defense spending is expected to decline by 28 percent from FY 2011 to 2019 in real terms, according to a report from DOD’s Office of Economic Adjustment (OEA) examining defense spending at the state and local levels in FY 2014.On Wednesday from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., the agency will hold a webinar on the report, featuring Christine Chmura, CEO, chief economist and principal at Chmura Economics and Analytics, which prepared the report. To register for the event, visit the OEA website.The report highlights factors, such as the regional expenditures from military bases or private contractors, which can be used by state and local officials to assess their region’s vulnerability to projected declines in defense spending. The impact of DOD spending cuts has been uneven across states, as it depends in part on the number of personnel and the amount of contract revenue in each state, according to the report.Overall, defense spending is accounting for a smaller portion of state economies as the military draws down from two overseas conflicts and the 2011 Budget Control Act imposes stringent spending caps.For further information about the webinar, contact Elizabeth Chimienti at elizabeth.a.chimienti.civ@mail.mil.last_img read more

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT Wilmingtons Cornish Trivellin Graduate From Becker College

first_imgWORCESTER, MA — Becker College recognized graduates during the College’s 230th Commencement Ceremony on May 5, 2018.Jocelyn Cornish, of Wilmington, graduated Magna Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing.Roy Trivellin III, of Wilmington, graduated Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing.About Becker CollegeFounded in 1784, Becker College is an undergraduate and graduate, career-focused private college, providing a supportive and inclusive learning community that prepares graduates for their first to last careers. Nearly 1,800 students from the United States and around the world live and learn on the College’s Worcester and Leicester campuses. With nationally recognized programs in nursing, game design and animal studies, Becker has been consistently ranked as a “Best College” for undergraduate education by The Princeton Review.(NOTE: The above announcement is from Becker College via Merit.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSTUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Mason & Ravagni Graduate From Becker CollegeIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Mason & Ravagni Named To Dean’s List At Becker CollegeIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: 4 Wilmington Students Graduate From Endicott CollegeIn “Education”last_img read more

Speeding Is Now Causing About The Same Number Of Crashes As Drunk

first_img Gail Delaughter Traffic on the Katy Freeway feeder road.According to the study from the National Transportation Safety Board, about 27% of crashes around the U.S. can now be blamed on speeding.  That’s not much less than the 29% that result from driving drunk.Kara Macek with the Governors Highway Safety Association says speeding just doesn’t have the same social stigma.“Of course if you’re going 90, 100 miles per hour that may raise some eyebrows,” adds Macek. “But by and large people do it.”To get people to slow down, the NTSB study says there has to be more enforcement. That includes things like speed cameras which are currently banned here in Texas.Macek says road design can also encourage people to drive too fast.“We’ve kind of designed and engineered our roadways into a system that prioritizes moving vehicles very quickly,” explains Macek. “And not necessarily taking into account the vulnerable road users — bicycles, pedestrians, motorcycles.”According to TxDOT’s figures from 2016, there were close to 28,000 crashes around the state where drivers were under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Speed was a factor in over 26,000 crashes.  00:00 /01:05 Listen X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Sharelast_img read more

Full Show Lessons From Harvey And Political Roundup Oct 11 2017

first_img X Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: 00:00 /49:50 Share On Wednesday’s edition of Houston Matters: Emergency officials and health care experts are meeting in Galveston to talk about lessons learned from Harvey. The storm is one of a few disasters that will be discussed at today’s 2017 Regional Healthcare Preparedness Coalition Symposium. The Southeast Texas Regional Advisory Council is hosting this event. Lori Upton, the organization’s regional director of emergency management operations, talks with Houston Matters about what action she wants to see come out of this gathering.Also this hour: It’s time again for the Houston Matters weekly roundup of national, state, and local political stories with an eye for how it all might affect Houston and Texas. Our panel of political experts this week includes: Jay Aiyer from Texas Southern University, Jeremi Suri from UT-Austin, and Andrew Schneider, politics and government reporter for News 88.7.Plus: We discuss what we can learn from Houston’s sister cities. Then, we talk with investigative reporter Melissa Del Bosque about her book Bloodlines, based on the true story about how two FBI agents investigated a dangerous criminal organization in Mexico by tracking money laundering through horse racing in the U.S.We offer a free daily, downloadable podcast here, on iTunes, Stitcher and various other podcasting apps.last_img read more

Physicists gadget lets you hear the sound of a perfect golf swing

first_img Citation: Physicist’s gadget lets you hear the sound of a perfect golf swing (2008, September 2) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-09-physicist-gadget-golf.html Golf is a game of intense concentration. Golfers receive advice on the precise stance, grip, wrist angle, shoulder angle, head angle, and other details to improve their swings. But a new golf gadget developed by a Yale physics professor takes a different approach to golf training. Rather than focusing on the mechanics, the device lets players literally “tune in” to the sound of their swings. The Physics of a golf swing Explore further Professor Bob Grober´s invention, called System-1, instantly converts the velocity of a golf swing into sound, allowing the player to hear their swing in progress. The device consists of two components. A long, thin electronics piece slides into the shaft of almost any club, which includes sensors and a microprocessor to measure the swing´s velocity. The data is then wirelessly transmitted to a receiver that can be tucked into a golfer´s pocket, which converts the data to sound and sends it to a headset. A golf swing can be programmed to sound like one of about 120 instruments, such as piano, piccolo, viola, or synthesized rock organ. The faster the club moves, the higher the pitch and volume. Grober hopes that the device will help people better understand the tempo, timing, and rhythm of their swings in an intuitive way.”Getting people to change mechanical things, which are habits, is a very difficult thing, it could take months or maybe years,” Grober said in a video at Courant.com. “But when you turn all of that into something that people can hear, people are very good at adjusting sound, people are very sensitive to sound. And you can get people to change habits, mechanical things that they do, on the timescale of 5, 10, 15 minutes. Once you let them hear what it sounds like and show them how easy it is to do, that changes things in a dramatic way.”Grober founded a company called Sonic Golf to market System-1. So far, he has sold seven of the devices at $1,000 each. Among his customers is Vijay Singh, a Masters and two-time PGA Championship winner, who bought one in June and uses it daily. Other customers include PGA Champion Rich Beem, tour veteran Fred Funk and CBS Sports commentator Peter Kostas.Grober plans to produce another 100 units by mid-September and batches of 1,000 by January. He also hopes to reduce the price to around $400, and will try to appeal to professionals as well as hobbyists. The device might also be useful for physical therapy applications.He says that there are lots of golf gadgets on the market that promise to improve your game. However, most of them don´t work. He also noted that other golf devices exist that use sound to improve technique, such as the popular David Leadbetter Swing Setter, but hopes that his invention will offer something new.But he says developing the technology was the easy part. Developing a successful business is more challenging. He has contracts with local suppliers in Connecticut to produce the shaft insert and the electronics, and he´s currently looking for a company to package the product.As Yale´s Frederick Phineas Rose Professor of Applied Physics, Grober studies excitons, biexcitons and electron-hole plasma in narrow quantum wells. He says that golf is just a hobby that got out of control. A former intercollegiate player at Vanderbilt, he now has a handicap between zero and two. Although he teaches an introductory course at Yale called “Physics of the Game of Golf,” most of Grober´s academic work is unrelated to the Sonic Golf technology.More information: www.sonicgolf.comvia: www.courant.com Physics Professor Bob Grober plans to produce 100 System-1 devices by mid-September and batches of 1,000 by January. He hopes to reduce the price to around $400, and will try to appeal to professionals as well as hobbyists. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Firefox 47 Brings Synced Tabs Sidebar Improved YouTube Playback and More

first_imgAdvertisement Firefox has released an upgrade for its desktop and Android browsers, introducing additional utilities. The new Firefox 47 brings a ‘Synced Tabs Sidebar’ that allows you to skim through open tabs on iOS, Android, and the Web simultaneously.The desktop version, for Linux, OS X, and Windows, gets a new Synced Tabs feature. This allows users to access tabs that remain open in their Android and iOS devices. If users are signed-in on their Android and iOS apps, the Synced Tab Sidebar on the left will collate all the tabs and show them in a list format.To use Synced Tabs, users can just click on the menu button on the top right of the browser, and select the Synced Tab option. Once you click on the ‘View Synced Tabs Sidebar’ option, the sidebar shows up on the left side of the browser, with tabs from all the devices that have Firefox installed with the same sign-in. – Advertisement – Firefox 47 also improves video playback on YouTube on certain laptops with powerful multiprocessors. It uses less bandwidth, and improves battery life on laptops. The new version supports VP9 video codec, which provides higher quality video resolution with an average bandwidth reduction of 35 percent. The entire change log is detailed here.On the Android app, it brought the ability to hide Web fonts. Web fonts essentially slow a site’s load time eating up more data. Hiding web fonts may reduce the amount of data required for browsing.The previous version Firefox 46 was released in April, and brought along security improvements and fixes. For Android users, it introduced better user notifications and clearer homescreen shortcut icons.The new version can be downloaded on Firefox website, and app users will get an OTA update in Google Play gradually.[Gadgets 360]last_img read more