Climate change pilot projects launched in Jamaica

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Jamaica’s Senate Begins debate on National Identification and Registration Bill Related Items:#magneticmedianews, climate change, jamaica Two boys die, bicycle and van collide in St. Catherine, Jamaica Bahamas DPM Turnquest, as IDB Governor, Talks Technology and Climate Change Resilience at IDB Conclave Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppJamaica, September 13, 2017 – Kingston – Three pilot projects set to test climate smart technologies and techniques in the parishes of Clarendon and St Ann will officially come on stream at a major launch event in Clarendon on Wednesday. The project will target communities in upper Clarendon impacted by drought and poor water supply, select schools as well as rural farming communities in St Ann.The projects funded by the government of Japan under the Japan Caribbean Climate Change Partnership are implemented by the United Nations Development Programme in Jamaica in partnership with the ministry of industry, commerce, agriculture and fisheries through the Rural Agricultural Development Authority (RADA) and the Jamaica 4-H Clubs; the Climate Change Division in the ministry of economic growth and job creation; the Clarendon Parish Development Committee Benevolent Society (CPDCBS), and other local stakeholdersDaryl Vaz, minister without portfolio in the ministry of economic growth and job creation with responsibility for the land, environment, climate change and investment is set to address the launch event.The Japan Caribbean Climate Change Partnership with a regional allocation of US$15 million was launched last year in Kingston and Bridgetown. The pilot projects mark a new and important milestone in regional implementation and are expected to enhance local capacity to adapt to and lessen the impacts of climate change, especially in target communities.Climate change continues to be a major concern to small island developing states (SIDS) like Jamaica. Climate change causes rising temperatures, changes in the seasons including growing seasons for crops, heavier rainfall and stronger and more intense storms, with flooding; more severe droughts and heat waves; rising sea levels impacting coastal communities and infrastructure.last_img read more

California Sunday Brings December Issue East in the Form of an Art

first_img“We love opportunities to bring the print magazine to life,” says Jacqueline Bates, photography director for California Sunday Magazine, adding that in addition to the gallery show, the magazine has posted audio accompaniment to each of the issue’s stories on its website. “It really makes for a more multilayered reading experience. It’s less linear, and you can also listen to the audio on your phone as you walk through the exhibit.”Published bimonthly, California Sunday dedicates one issue a year to a single theme (last year’s was the lives of teenagers), and because photography has always been an essential aspect of the magazine, Bates says the team decided to make this year’s themed issue an “all-photography” one. Text in the issue, which features work from 34 different photographers, is minimal—mostly confined to captions and credits.Elisabeth Gambrell, Gerlach, Nev. — Katy Grannan“We knew we wanted to make an issue told entirely through photography,” Bates adds. “In a year when wildfires, rising housing costs, and controversial immigration issues have dominated the news, ‘Home,’ and how people come to find and define it, has never felt more important.”The 34 contributors to the issue are a mix of both up-and-coming and established photographers and artists, such as Jim Goldberg, whose work can be seen in the Museum of Modern Art and the National Gallery in Washington. Another contributor, Taylor Kay Johnson, is a recent graduate introduced to California Sunday when her California College of the Arts class worked with the magazine on an Instagram takeover last year.Mary Dambacher, Taos, N.M. — Ahndraya Parlato &Gregory HalpernThe subjects of each feature, themselves wide-ranging in both geography and circumstance, are divided into sections organized by distance, says Bates, from those who are “Far Away”—long-distance firefighters, a family separated at the U.S. border—to those who are “In Between”—a high school student in San Diego who visits his deported mother in Tijuana—to those who are “Home”—a pair of formerly homeless men on move-in day at a San Francisco housing complex.For the cover story alone, “we assigned 19 photographers across 10 states, and from there allowed them to wander and look for stories of ‘Home,’” Bates continues. “We met a Bay Area transplant who made a sanctuary out of his sailboat, a mother who built a bathroom from scratch for her and her daughter, a DACA recipient who just purchased his first house, and many others.”All of this—a feature well whose subjects range from Alaska to Mexico and a coinciding gallery activation in New York City—beg the obvious conclusion that California Sunday envisions an audience that expands well beyond the Golden State. (Case in point: I recently purchased a copy at a magazine shop in London.)“From the very beginning, we made stories for a national audience of curious, creative people,” publisher Chas Edwards tells Folio:, noting that the magazine’s stories often focus on the broader American West, in addition to Asia and Latin America. “Among our digital readers, New Yorkers are the second biggest group after Californians, so we’re always eager to find ways to get closer to our New York fans.”Roscoe Mitchell, Oakland, Calif. — David BlackDebbie Austin, Portland, Ore. — Lauren Angalis FieldBut the business sense behind the gallery exhibit isn’t just about the prospect of picking up a few more East Coast customers for the magazine’s $39.99-per-year print subscriptions. The entire project, including both the exhibit and the December issue, is sponsored by the Google Pixel 3—the same smartphone that shot the November covers of Allure, Architectural Digest, Bon Appétit, Condé Nast Traveler, Glamour, GQ, and W as part of a promotional partnership with Condé Nast.In addition to behind-the-scenes photos shot on the Pixel 3 depicting the December issue’s production, the integration includes displays of photos taken on the phone at the Aperture exhibit, custom ad inserts in the issue that blend in with the look and feel of the editorial.“We love it when we find a sponsor that’s willing to work with us, specifically our Brand Studio team, on a program that delivers new, compelling experiences to our community of readers and fans,” adds Edwards. “These are opportunities to support the journalism and storytelling we do, and at the same time deliver added goodness to our audience.” The California Sunday Magazine may still be a baby by national magazine standards—especially compared to the legacy institutions against which it has become a regular competitor for National Magazine Awards each March—but it’s accomplished quite a bit in its four years of existence.It’s most recent achievement, and perhaps its most financially impactful, was securing an acquisition by Laurene Powell Jobs’ Emerson Collective, whose other media-related investments include funding for nonprofits like The Committee to Protect Journalists, The Marshall Project, Mother Jones, and ProPublica, as well as a majority stake in The Atlantic.In a statement announcing the acquisition, Powell Jobs called California Sunday and its sister brand, the touring stage show Pop-Up Magazine, “unique journalistic platforms that help foster empathy and better understanding in the world.”Those values of empathy and understanding are on display this month—literally—at the Aperture Foundation in Manhattan, at which visitors can take in “At Home: In the American West,” a gallery exhibition featuring over 90 photographs in an extension of the magazine’s December issue cover story.last_img read more

Facebook pages get facelift with new page layout design

first_img Comment Facebook 1 Facebook’s layout has shifted from three columns to two and removed a lot of clutter. Screenshot by Steven Musil/CNET If you think your Facebook page looks a bit different today, you’re not alone.The social networking giant appears to have rolled out a new page design on Tuesday, eschewing the previous three-column layout for one that incorporates only two. On the right is static information about the page, while the left side contains the feed of recent posts.Facebook tinkers with its design from time to time, but this is a pretty radical departure from the site’s previous appearance. In addition to the column change, the content on pages appears less cluttered, with plenty of eye-appealing white space and an increased emphasis on thumbnail images. It wasn’t immediately clear how widespread this rollout is or how different types of pages will see a face-lift.  Facebook didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. Share your voice Internet Tech Industry Tagslast_img read more

At least 18 dead in China karaoke lounge fire

first_imgMap locating Qingyuan in China where a deadly blaze broke out at a karaoke lounge. Photo: AFPA fire tore through a karaoke lounge in southern China on Tuesday, killing 18 people and injuring another five, as authorities sought an arson suspect who had reportedly blocked the entrance with a motorcycle.The fire started after midnight in a three-storey building in Qingyuan City, Guangdong province, and was put out shortly before 1:00am local time, according to the police.A preliminary investigation found that it was caused by arson, the Qingyuan public security department said on its Weibo social media account.The suspect got into an argument, then used a motorcycle to block the building’s door and lit the fire, state broadcaster CCTV said, adding that he was on the lam.The police said that “in order to quickly catch the suspect”, it was offering a 200,000 yuan ($32,000) reward for information leading to the arrest of a man identified as a 32-year-old with burn marks on his hips.The police statement did not describe the location of the fire but state media said it occurred in a small KTV house, or karaoke lounge.Unverified videos from the scene posted by local media show flames leaping from the building on a tree-lined street at night, with fire trucks and a crowd of onlookers on the road.The five injured people are receiving treatment in a hospital, state TV said.Karaoke is a popular activity in China, with even shopping centres featuring booths where people can sit and sing their favourite songs.Larger KTV lounges proliferate as well, often spanning across multiple floors in a building, with narrow corridors linking dozens of individual rooms together.The lounge where the fire occurred was smaller, with only one corridor for entry and exit, state TV said.Merrymakers often go for a buffet dinner and sing and drink with a small group of friends in the private rooms late into the night.Deadly fires are common in China, where safety regulations are widely flouted and enforcement is often lax.Common firesA blaze that killed 38 people at a nursing home in 2015 sparked soul-searching about safety standards in China. Courts jailed 21 people, including firefighters and government staff, over the fire last year.The legal representative of the Kangleyuan Nursing Home was sentenced to nine years in prison for constructing an illegal extension to the property, while the contractor was given a six-year sentence for using flammable materials to build an extension.In the days following the accident, China’s top safety watchdog said the facility had poorly-designed fire exits, while safety checks, fire and electricity management, and the emergency response system were all found lacking.More than two dozen people were killed in two fires in Beijing’s migrant neighbourhoods late last year.The first blaze, which killed 19 people in November, prompted authorities to begin tearing down unsafe buildings in the capital, driving hundreds of thousands of down on their luck residents out in the middle of winter.last_img read more