Darwinism Still Corrupts Culture

first_imgThe bad fruits of Social Darwinism are well known. Less well known are ongoing negative influences of modern Darwinian ideas on human behavior.How Do You Correct Behavior Based on Fake Science?Have you been led to believe that men are naturally more promiscuous because sperm cells are cheap? that women are more choosy because eggs are costly? It’s all bunk. Phys.org just published the following headline: “Data should smash the biological myth of promiscuous males and sexually coy females.” That’s strong wording: smash, myth. New findings are teaching the opposite: men can be coy, and women promiscuous. But both ideas, being based on Darwinian ideas that people are just animals, can have unspeakably horrible consequences for marriage, family, and civilization.The article is merciless in its attack on this myth:These ideas, which are pervasive in Western culture, also have served as the cornerstone for the evolutionary study of sexual selection, sex differences and sex roles among animals. Only recently have some scientists – fortified with modern data – begun to question their underlying assumptions and the resulting paradigm.If Thomas Kuhn were still living, he would have here a great new illustration of his theory of paradigm shifts and scientific revolutions. The article fingers Charles Darwin himself as the mastermind of this fake science. His disciples took it and ran with it.These simple assumptions are based, in part, on the differences in size and presumed energy cost of producing sperm versus eggs – a contrast that we biologists call anisogamy. Charles Darwin was the first to allude to anisogamy as a possible explanation for male-female differences in sexual behavior.His brief mention was ultimately expanded by others into the idea that because males produce millions of cheap sperm, they can mate with many different females without incurring a biological cost. Conversely, females produce relatively few “expensive,” nutrient-containing eggs; they should be highly selective and mate only with one “best male.” He, of course, would provide more than enough sperm to fertilize all a female’s eggs.Surely this notion was tested, right? The article explains how Angus Bateman, a botanist, ran some experiments one time in 1948 on fruit flies (not human fly-by-nighters). Telling a whopper from this miniscule test, he alleged that the promiscuous-male-choosy-female scenario “was a near-universal characteristic of all sexually reproducing species.” In 1972, Robert Trivers amplified on the idea, talking about males’ “cheap investment” in sperm. Read the following quote, and think about what sexually active guys in dorm rooms are supposed to think about normal behavior after evolutionary biology class:In other words, females evolved to choose males prudently and mate with only one superior male; males evolved to mate indiscriminately with as many females as possible. Trivers believed that this pattern is true for the great majority of sexual species.The problem is, it isn’t true! The article explains many counter-examples. Men have just as much reason to be careful about their sex cells. It’s not the number; it’s the biological cost, the article explains. Semen contains many compounds that are expensive to produce. Men can run out of sperm. Consequently, males have every reason to be “choosy” about mating, too. Think of the consequences of poorly-tested bad ideas:The problem is, modern data simply don’t support most of Bateman’s and Trivers’ predictions and assumptions. But that didn’t stop “Bateman’s Principle” from influencing evolutionary thought for decades.Now get this: the article—still founded on evolutionary notions that people are just animals—makes matters even worse. Based on the latest Darwinian notions about sex, the article claims that females tend to be just as promiscuous as males. Think about how that will influence college students!If you think nobody teaches “Bateman’s Principle” any more these days, look at another post on Phys.org that came about the same time, like two ships passing in the night. Steiner Branslet writes about “One night stand regrets.” Another study supposedly shows that women have more regrets than men about casual sex. Look what it’s based on:“Women and men differ fundamentally in their sexual psychology,” says Professor Buss. “A key limitation on men’s reproductive success, historically, has been sexual access to fertile women. These evolutionary selection pressures have created a male sexual mind that is attentive to sexual opportunities.“The quality of one’s sexual partner in short-term relationships plays a lesser role biologically for men. Assuming women did not avoid having sex with them, men who ran from woman to woman and got them pregnant would have scored best in the evolutionary race.Sounds like Bateman’s Principle, right? Sure. Men just act the way evolution makes them act. “Female choice—deciding when, where, and with whom to have sex— is perhaps the most fundamental principle of women’s sexual psychology,” says one of the evolutionists in the article, referring implicitly to the views of Darwin, Bateman and Trivers. How about the guys? “These evolutionary selection pressures have created a male sexual mind that is attentive to sexual opportunities.”Take these quotes and apply them to the dormitory. Think of all the blessed effects on marriage and family down the line; after all, “Culture does not change biology,” this article admonishes. We can’t fight natural selection. Nor should we.An overall explanation presumably lies in the fundamental differences between men and women.The study results support theories of parental investment and sexual strategy: men and women have throughout generations invested differently in their relationships and any children that resulted.We’re talking evolution psychology here.Of course, if humans are more than mere animals, the whole conversation is fake science. We have comprehensive instructions from an all-wise Creator on how we are are to choose our sexual behaviors. But to the consensus, that doesn’t qualify as science. They feel we must derive our sexual ethics from the blind processes of natural selection, which couldn’t care a whit about morals.Other Darwin Fake Science with Evil FruitBateman’s Principle is not the only example of fake science that corrupts culture. Here are more interested readers can investigate:Social Darwinism in 2017. Can you get away with racism today? Evolutionists appear to have no qualms. In a PNAS paper entitled, “Selection against variants in the genome associated with educational attainment,” no less than 15 evolutionists claim that Icelanders with less education have more kids. “The rate of decrease is small per generation but marked on an evolutionary timescale,” they say. “Another important observation is that the association between the score and fertility remains highly significant after adjusting for the educational attainment of the individuals.” Figure this conundrum out: “This is thus a striking case where a variant associated with a phenotype typically regarded as unfavorable could nonetheless be also associated with increased ‘fitness’ in the evolutionary sense.” Well, if that’s the case, might as well go with the flow. Quit school and have more sex. Darwinism is as Darwinism does.Myth-busting Neanderthal narrative takes decades. A lengthy piece in the New York Times shows how long it has taken to overcome what CEH calls “historical racism,” the myth that fossil humans were “other” than human. That’s why we give them other species names, like Homo neanderthalensis. NY Times reporter Jon Mooallem interviews the work of Clive Finlayson at Gibraltar who shows many reasons why “Neanderthals were people, too.” He tells how Frenchman Marcellin Boule in 1911 propagated the Neanderthal myth of stoop-shouldered, beetle-browed imbeciles on their way to the cave cookout. “A lot of what he said was wrong,” Mooallem finds from Finlayson. “Still, Boule’s influence was long-lasting. Over the years, his ideologically tainted image of Neanderthals was often refracted through the lens of other ideologies, occasionally racist ones.”LGBT tales. The inverse influence of culture on science is a fascinating area of philosophy. Check for it in a book review in Science Magazine this week, where Sheri Berenbaum wrestles with the normality of deviant gender roles while reviewing Cordelia Fine’s new book, Testosterone Rex Myths of Sex, Science, and Society (Norton, 2017). Approach this quote like a qualified observer of social influences on science, paying attention to Berebaum’s use of culturally-popular buzzphrases as she plays the academic “On the one hand this, but on the other hand that” game:I welcome and applaud Fine’s efforts to ground policy in science and to spotlight the false reasoning and dichotomies that appear in popular books and some policies (such as single-sex education). I also recognize (and regret) the long history—and present—of using biology to justify inferior treatment of women. This no doubt contributes to resistance to evidence of biological differences among those seeking gender equality.The challenge is not to dismiss biological explanations of sex differences but to articulate clearly their implications. We can accept that biology contributes to behavioral sex differences and simultaneously argue that gender inequalities are not intractable. Rather than rejecting biological differences, we must seek to reveal the nonsense in the arguments that brain and behavioral sex differences justify discrimination, segregation, and differential treatment of the sexes.Shocking but true. At Live Science, Jonathan Sadowsky of Case Western Reserve University tells about “the wild history of electroconvulsive therapy.” Early shock treatments were horrifying to watch; modern ones are milder, he says. While not directly tied to Darwinian theory, this article assumes the brain is merely a physical organ, and that shocking it with electrical impulses can help with “mental illnesses” that are assumed to be mere biological abnormalities. While some forms of depression have biological causes, what about mental illnesses that have a spiritual root or stem from true guilt? The following quote shows how scientific thinking is often tied to the culture of the day. This example is from the 1950s. Are scientists today culpable of such “medicalizing behavior”?At that time, ECT was also used as a “treatment” for homosexuality, then considered by psychiatrists to be an illness. This was not a major part of ECT practice, but this is not a comfort to gay people who received the treatment, for whom it could be traumatizing. The psychiatrists who used ECT in this way sincerely believed they were trying to help sick people, which serves as a warning against “medicalizing” behavior, and assuming that this will reduce stigma. This use of ECT did not last, in part because there was no evidence it did alter anyone’s sexuality. But it survived in the social memory of the therapy.Punish nations with carbon penance. Nature‘s editorial this week says, “Base the social cost of carbon on the science.” The very title assumes that science can speak definitively on something as global as climate a hundred years from now, when we can’t even predict the weather 15 days out. New unknowns and revisions come out weekly, as we have reported (1/18/17); just today, Phys.org said that humans, not climate, caused the extinction of megafauna in Australia 45,000 Darwin years ago. While not tied to Darwinian evolution directly, this editorial shares the assumptions of scientism and millions of years. Nature‘s anti-Trumpism comes out again in the article, accusing the new US president and his appointees of “disregard for science” even though the Editors acknowledge, “There is, of course, plenty of room for debate.”Fake science and false certainty. In closing, we should consider the views  of a Worldview op-ed column in Nature: “Anita Makri argues that the form of science communicated in popular media leaves the public vulnerable to false certainty.” Yet she argues that scientists should “Give the public the tools to trust scientists.” Mouthing Pontius Pilate, she begins, “What is truth?” Of the two groups she works in that are concerned with truth (scientists and journalists), she believes that journalists are doing a good job (despite all the evidence for fake news in the mainstream media, complained about by conservatives, like Breitbart News; see also Breitbart’s report on BBC’s admission they’ve been biased; meanwhile, New Scientist is overtly publishing a very biased and unscientific series, “Resisting Trump”). But “Scientists need to catch up, or they risk further marginalization in a society that is increasingly weighing evidence and making decisions without them.” Science is “losing its relevance as a source of truth,” she worries.Yet further reading reveals her faith in scientism. The only purveyors of fake news are the conservatives, she suggests with a link to another Nature story accusing Breitbart News of that. To Makri, scientists don’t tell lies; they just don’t have all the facts yet. Scientists may have gaps in their knowledge, but it will eventually catch up to the truth, because in scientism, science works as a truth generator in due time—the most reliable truth generator in the world. “Current debates about truth are far from trivial,” she ends. “More scientists and communicators of science need to get involved, update practices and reposition themselves in a way that gets with the times and shows that science matters — while it still does.” In other words, scientists don’t have a truth problem; just a talking points problem (echoed in Nature‘s interviews with three scientists about how to solve “post-truth predicaments”). One wonders what would be these “experts”‘ responses to the paradigms above about promiscuity, Neanderthals, electroshock therapy, racism and the other matters that have really hurt real people under the guise of “scientific truth.”After the historical and current examples we listed above, do you trust scientists when it comes to their pronouncements about how people should live and behave? Jesus said it succinctly with timeless wisdom: “You will know them by their fruits” (Matthew 7:15-20). A species puts out what is in its genes.One scientist wrote a letter to Nature that bears quoting. “Beware of scientists wielding red pens,” he titles his comment about censorship.By inviting scientists to take their ‘red pens to the Internet’ and grade online sources of science reporting, Phil Williamson implies that science is the primary and final voice in public discussion (Nature 540, 171; 2016). This disregards other ways in which people make sense of their lives through political debate, social context, personal connections or beliefs (see also D. Sarewitz Nature 522, 413–414; 2015). It stems from the naive myth of science as a disinterested producer of neutral truths.Science has a delicate relationship with society. Both have the right to speak and both shape one another — for better or worse. Governance and government rely increasingly on a science that is embedded in socio-political arenas populated by scientists, policymakers and citizens, among others. Not every expertise is equally credible, but a democratic society should allow each one to have a voice.To discredit them online may feel like defending the honour and public status of science, but it is a form of censorship. Science cannot impose its truths through power play — it must convince through symmetrical and open conversation. Whoa! Did you get that?In that second link, Sarewitz had said this:Scientists are not elected. They cannot represent the cultural values, politics and interests of citizens — not least because their values may differ significantly from those of people in other walks of life. A 2007 study on the social implications of nanotechnology, for instance, showed that nanoscientists had little concern about such technologies eliminating jobs, whereas the public was greatly concerned (see ‘A matter of perspective’). Each group was being rational. Nanoscientists have good reason to be optimistic about the opportunities created by technological frontiers; citizens can be justifiably worried that such frontiers will wreak havoc on labour markets. Unfortunately, such voices of reason are often drowned out by Big Scientism.(Visited 133 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Early May planting dates better for soybeans

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ohio soybeans planted from May 1 through mid-May resulted in better yields, according to a study by researchers from Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center.In the study of 2013 and 2014 planting trials at OARDC’s Western Agricultural Research Station near South Charleston, Ohio, soybean yields decreased by 0.6 bushels per acre per day when planted after mid-May, according to Laura Lindsey, a soybean and small grains specialist with OSU Extension.Those yield results held true if the soil temperatures were 50 degrees or warmer, Lindsey said. However, soybeans planted too early when soil conditions were not adequate resulted in bean leaf beetle defoliation and frost damage.Canopy closure beneficial“There are some exceptions to a yield advantage when planting early, such as if the soils aren’t warm enough or if the fields are too wet,” she said. “In those cases, early planting can be detrimental to soybean yields. “The greatest benefit of planting May 1 to mid-May is canopy closure, which increases light interception, improves weed control by shading out weeds, and helps retain soil moisture.”In a recent posting in the college’s Crop Observation and Recommendation Network (C.O.R.N) newsletter, Lindsey said soybean growers need to consider planting conditions before heading to the field.“Soybean germination begins when soil temperatures reach 50 degrees and moisture is present at the planting depth of 1-1.5 inches,” she said. “With these conditions, emergence can typically be expected 2-3 weeks after planting.”Lindsey cautions growers not to plant early if the soil is excessively cold or wet.Timely planting critical“Slower germination and compaction can negate the benefits of the earlier planting date,” she said. “Timely planting is critical for maximizing yield in soybeans, but using good judgment on field conditions plays a role that is equally important to determining yield potential.”Seeding rates and row spacing are also important to consider to achieve optimum soybean yields, Lindsey said.Preliminary results of another two-year study of soybean seeding rates and row spacing show fields with between 100,000-140,000 plants per acre at harvest will result in yields that generally provide the maximum economic return, she said.“The study also found that soybeans planted at 7.5- and 15-inch row widths outyielded soybeans planted at 30-inch row widths,” Lindsey said. “Soybeans planted in the 30-inch rows yielded on average 15 to 20% lower than those planted in the narrower rows.”The study, which is funded by the Ohio Soybean Council, will also use data from this year’s growing season to compare to last year’s results, Lindsey said.last_img read more

Video Inspiration: Ice Caves and a GoPro

first_imgFly through Alaskan ice caves in this awesome drone video shot by Firefight Films.We’ve seen a lot of creative drone videos in the last few months (check out Superman with a GoPro) but we think we may have found the most beautiful one.Firefight Films have released a video titled Bigger Than Life which features a ton of awesome drone footage shot in Alaskan ice caves. Believe it or not, the entire thing was shot using a GoPro. Check it out:Firefight Films were also super kind to include a behind the scenes video on how they made Bigger Than Life. They stated that they shot 100% of the footage using a GoPro HERO 3+ Black Edition and a DJI Phantom. Just goes to show what’s possible if you have the right equipment and a plane ticket to Alaska.You can buy your own DJI Phantom for $700 bucks on DJI’s website.  This video was created and shared by Firefight Films – thanks for sharing guys!Seen any other beautiful drone videos?Share in the comments below.last_img read more

Marketing Maven Links

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics: Originally published May 17, 2008 8:44:00 PM, updated October 01 2013 Social Media Here are some great articles from Links.HubSpot.com from the past week:How to Get More Twitter Followers: Some Methods That WorkBuilding Your Online Brand With Social Media Tools10 Steps for Digg Success When You’re the VillainAlso, here are some useful reads from the HubSpot Internet Marketing Blog archives, from about a year ago (when many of you were not reading this blog yet).3 Hot Marketing Tips from Heat Map Analysis (images)Now, Any Business Can Tap 53 Million Facebook Users (For Free) Have a great weekend!last_img read more

Top 5 Inbound Marketing Articles to Start the Week: Humanizing Social Media

first_img on SEOmoz . An editorial calendar, or a publishing schedule, serves as the foundation of article, Social Media Explorer discusses the need for more humanization when it comes to online marketing and engagement. 3. inbound marketing 1. Help build trust in your brand by being transparent about the people who make up your business and who communicate with customers and prospects. editorial calendar Topics: Marketing Takeaway: In the world of on Social Media Explorer 2. Social Media Humanization on Search Engine Journal Learn strategies to monitor your company’s brand and engagement in social media in just 10 minutes per day! Smiciklas’ article discusses the problematic disconnect between businesses and people online. He highlights the need to first understand your audience then suggests various tactics that can be used to humanize your brand in social media such as featuring employees in photos, avatars, ‘about us’ pages and other content. Marketing Takeaway: Zack Grossbart and Justin Evans now plays an important role in how many businesses are engaging with prospects and customers, but despite the implications of the term, it’s easy to question just how ‘human’ social media interactions really are. , it’s becoming easier and easier for businesses to lose sight of the fact that, while their organization may be represented online by a logo or an icon, it’s the person-to-person connections that build trust in a brand. Marketing Takeaway: Author: The Easy-to-Use Tool That Helps You Build a Breakthrough Blog Content marketing tactics Before diving into the meat of his article, the Blog Tyrant emphasizes the point, “one loyal reader is worth thousands of one-time visitors.” He continues to highlight three problems that will make readers leave your blog and will kill your chances of gaining loyal readers. He also provides detailed suggestions for how to fix each problem. on Problogger Marketing Takeaway: mentioned include positive user-generated content (UGC), local interest, and local expertise, and Dr. Pete emphasizes the fact that despite your perception that you might be in a ‘boring’ industry, you shouldn’t be afraid to get creative. Video: How To Monitor Your Social Media Presence In 10 Minutes A Day Authors: Oztalay therefore offers several suggestions to help businesses take advantage of listing sites and increase interactivity on their pages, such as updating listings with marketing materials (e.g. coupons, offers, events, discounts, promotions, etc.), removing or claiming duplicate listings, responding to existing customer reviews (particularly negative ones, and securing positive reviews from satisfied customers. on Copyblogger Dr. Pete Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack The three killer blog problems he identifies are a lack of comments, a butchered theme, and no original ideas. Originally published Oct 11, 2010 8:00:00 AM, updated July 19 2013 and goes to show that a bit of planning can go a long way in getting maximum reach from your blog. based on quality inbound links is key. This SEOmoz article stresses the powerful role remarkable content can play in link-building, offering several tips and examples of content marketing ideas in various industries to get you thinking in the right direction. Marketing Takeaway: In this week’s top 4. If your your local business listing on Google Author: For businesses facing heavy competition in online marketing, Melih Oztalay SEO Three Problems That Make Me Leave Your Blog in Three Seconds (Remarkable) content is king. Use creativity in content marketing and reap the rewards of quality inbound links. Maintain an editorial calendar for more strategic control over your blog’s content. Claiming your local business listing is only the first step. Make an effort to monitor engagement, update content, and interact with customers on your business’ listing pages. . While this is a good start, Search Engine Journal identifies a couple of areas businesses are missing out on regarding the topic of online business listings: claiming their listing only on Google and not other sites, and doing nothing else with their listing besides claiming it. 5. Author: By now, especially if you’re a regular reader of this blog, there’s a good chance you’ve already claimed Content Marketing That Stands Out The Blog Tyrant The easy-to-use tool mentioned by Copyblogger is none other than the to set up a solid routine to monitor your online presence! Zack and Justin’s article provide various ways an editorial calendar can be helpful: it allows you to plan ahead, it adds structure to your creativity, it enables you to take a great concept further, and it helps you be proactive and capitalize on search trends. They close their article by highlighting a free plugin that can help WordPress users start managing their own editorial calendar. blog strategic blogging Author: Mark Smiciklas is falling victim to one or more of these three problems, fix them right away to start attracting a loyal following of readers. internet marketing Claiming Local Business Listing Is Only the Beginning Social media Inbound Marketing View the video nowlast_img read more

How to Leverage LinkedIn to Market Your Business with @LewisHowes [@InboundNow #10]

first_img or LewisHowes.com If a group already exists in your niche, Lewis recommends creating a new group but geographically focus it in your own area.  On Becoming a Trust Agent with Chris Brogan What are people still getting wrong? , and a professional speaker, who covers a number of social media topics but mostly focuses on how individuals and companies can better leverage LinkedIn. Using LinkedIn for Business Best Practices with Lewis Howes Originally published Mar 3, 2011 12:01:00 PM, updated October 20 2016 A two page document that you mail into a company doesn’t cut it anymore. Linkedin Answers Podcasting for Business & Email Marketing Best Practices with Christopher S. Penn Make sure your LinkedIn profile is filled out 100%.  To Join or Create? LinkedWorking This is a great way to grow your network and potentially gain a future referral or a client. How to Rock Your Facebook Fan Page with John Haydon You need something that houses all of your skills and makes it as easy as possible for the company looking to hire you to do their research. Past work experience Where to start with LinkedIn LinkedIn Doesn’t Work Give the best answer overall and DON’t sell in the answer. To grow a Linkedin Group (much like a Facebook Page) you must continually share out useful information and spark conversation with members. The headline of your profile In this episode of Inbound Now, we are joined by Lewis Howes. Lewis is the author of two books Company Pages on Linkedin The company pages are still in their infancy, but Lewis think they might “be as powerful, if not more powerful than the Facebook Page probably in the next 6 to 12 months” with some of the changes LinkedIn has on deck. This will be an interesting turn of events if this happens. Gauging Online Influence with Jason Keath of Social Fresh How to Market Smarter, Faster, and Cheaper with David Siteman Garland How to build these activites into your daily workflow Recommend one person per week. SportsNetworker.com How to leverage Linkedin Groups , founder of First define your goals. What are you doing on linkedin? Are you building an email list, or you trying to drive leads, traffic? Spend 45-60 minutes a week answer questions Add keywords in five main places in your LinkedIn profile: Bottom line: Provide value.  Develop one question per week and send in to at least 50 qualified people for response. Increase the odds that LinkedIn searchers will find your profile :center_img Linkedin Content Strategy for Groups E-mail and ask a compelling question to three people I want to know better LinkedIn is your Resume on Steroids Topics: In the specialties area . Some of Lewis’s daily/weekly LinkedIn activites include: Video in Your ProfileYou can add in video to your LinkedIn profileby following Lewis’s tutorial. For a preview of what this looks like take a look at Lewis’s profile.  LinkedIn SEO The morale of the story, create a company page on LinkedIn and have it up to date and optimized. How Small Companies are Evolving with New Technologies with Phil Simon LinkedIn Marketing This is because these people set up their profile and let it sit for months and didn’t do anything with it or reach out and connect with other like minded people on the network. and For the full transcript and audio from the show head to:  LinkedIn Master Strategies “When you think about it for a second, when other professionals or businesses are asking questions on LinkedIn, they have a specific pain point at that moment. How do I build a website? How do I do this, how do I do that? My IT’s down, and this and that, right? They have a specific pain point that needs to be solved right now. If you can offer them the best resource, the best answer, the best information and be extremely helpful to them, without trying to sell them but just being helpful, that’s the most targeted buyer or anyone who’s going to hire you at anytime is when they’re asking a pain question. ” “If it’s not filled out 100%, if they’re aren’t recommendations of people vouching for you, showing some social proof or creditability about what you’ve done before, you don’t have a picture, if you just don’t have anything, if you have misspellings, things like that, then it’s just going to look pretty poor. So you want to make sure you have it filled out 100%.” Leverage the Answers section of LinkedIn. In the summary This time around we chat about: Share free webinars, free whitepapers, great links, and other content that will resonant with your audience. Don’t blatantly sell, or your group is destined to suck. Follow up with a brief reply privately with the person who asked the question and let them know you would be happy to help them with anything else pertaining to the issue. On your Company Page right now you can add reviews/recommendations to your products page, add in videos, and link back to your site. Past Episodes The age old question still looms, “Should you create a group on LinkedIn or just join them?” People are raising there hands and asking a ton of questions on LinkedIn.  One of the biggest complaints Lewis sees is people exclaiming “LinkedIn Doesn’t work!” Enter to win a signed copy of Lewis’s Book! Lewis recommends joining every group possible in your niche. This is to get a feel of which groups would be worth investing some time in and which are just full of spammers. When you find groups that are bubbling with thoughtful conversation, jump in and start asking and answering questions. on Twitter A Daily Workflow on Linkedin The same principles of real life networking also apply on LinkedIn. If you were to go to a networking event and not talk with anyone, do you think you would built any relationships or potential business leads?  Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Reach out and connect with 5 influencial people @LewisHowes Stop Marketing and Start Engaging with Scott Stratten Current work experience Connect with Lewis Online Some common mistakes to avoid last_img read more

6 Tips for Building Great Product Pages

first_img On-page SEO If you run an online business, chances are you understand search engine optimization, traffic reports, and meta data as general concepts. However, what you may not realize is that you need to optimize every single page on your website — especially your product pages.Here are 6 great tips for building effective product pages for your ecommerce website.1. Turn Product Pages Into Great ContentIn the product pages of your website, always use original images and videos with creative descriptions that are both entertaining and informative. Make your pages unique in order to separate you from your competitors. And always avoid duplicate content at all costs. 2. Design Your Pages So They Focus on ConversionsLayouts should be three columns with the most important content on the left and center, as close to the top as possible. Make it very easy for the user to add the product to a cart with just one click. Keep the checkout button near the images or videos and away from user-generated content, like comments, that you can’t always control. 3. Create Unique Content and DescriptionsDescriptions should always be your own, but you can add to them with charts, graphs, fun facts, or anything else entertaining that gives the user information and adds to the user experience on your site.4. Optimize Your URL StructureIncluding the product name with the category in your page’s URL is the easiest way to attract targeted traffic because search engines take URL structure into account, and your product page will look more relevant to them it includes keywords for the product name.Think: http://www.mysite.com/product-category/product-nameAs Opposed To: http://www.mysite.com/Item/90024971115. Add Rich Media, Like VideosImages, videos, charts, etc. are great for reaching a wider number of users. High-quality, original media has several benefits. Here are a few tips for using multimedia elements:License original mediaUse original content exclusively, not stock photos or generic videosBe innovativeRich media is a specialized subset of search queries and, as such, if you have a video or photo that becomes popular, make sure it links back to your product page to bring you more traffic. 6. Take a Look at Zappos as an ExampleWhen you conduct a Google search for ‘Zappos,’ the first thing you see is “Free Shipping.” By putting the word, “free” into their meta description, they have already captured the attention of many users. Then they use their product pages to complete the sale.For example, click the Nike shoe product on the Zappos homepage, and you will arrive here. From top to bottom, you’ll notice these features:The URL includes the product name.The navigation bar has the name again.The SKU number is also at the top because users searching for a specific product often know the SKU number and search by it.The photo is original, unique and able to be enlarged.The layout is organized into three columns with supplementary content on the right.Controllable customer feedback is much higher on the page than comments from customers.Main content is perfectly crafted for keyword optimization**.Bullet points and tags are displayed openly and cleanly.The keyword (product name) is written again in the bottom of the main content but above the supplementary content.The site map is at the bottom of the page.** There is a bullet with the product name, but this time the name is written with a trademark sign between the words, “Nike” and “Free.” They have broken the words up in this way to keep the full product name from looking like spam to a search engine. Notice, they did the same in the next bullet by leaving the “2” off the name and adding the SKU number.Yes, it will take some effort to optimize your product pages, but it will also pay off. You’ll see a decrease in bounce rates and a rise in conversion rates as you attract your target audience and convert them into reliable customers. Topics: Originally published Oct 13, 2011 8:00:00 PM, updated October 20 2016 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Foursquare Launches ‘Promoted Updates,’ PPC for Local Businesses

first_img Topics: Foursquare Originally published Jul 25, 2012 4:30:00 PM, updated October 20 2016 Foursquare explains that the algorithms used to power the ‘Explore’ tab’s normally personalized recommendations are the same ones Foursquare uses to determine which Promoted Updates get delivered to each user. These Promoted Updates could come from businesses that are on the user’s lists, places their Foursquare friends have visited or liked, or places a user might want to check out depending on their location or the time of day.For now, Foursquare is testing Promoted Updates with a group of pilot partners including both local businesses and nationwide brands such as Best Buy, Gap, Walgreens, and Dave & Buster’s. Over the upcoming months, Foursquare will be tracking how businesses use them and how users interact with them in order to make improvements, eventually rolling the feature out to all businesses on Foursquare. Companies looking to learn more about Promoted Updates can sign up using this form.We don’t know anything more about Promoted Updates or how much they cost, but one could assume that, since Foursquare likens them to Google AdWords, payment is likely pay-per-click style, based on keyword bids. And if you’re a business that has had success with location-based social media promotions in the past, it might be worth it to test Promoted Updates once they’re more widely available.What do you think about Promoted Updates? Will you experiment with them for your business? Looks like Foursquare has been a busy bee lately, announcing the second of two new features in just one week’s time. Today, the location-based social network is launching ‘Promoted Updates,’ similar in nature to the “Promoted” features we’ve seen from Facebook and Twitter.But because we never covered Foursquare’s other launch of ‘Local Updates’ last week, let’s do a quick summary before we move onto Foursquare’s latest announcement.What Are Local Updates?Local Updates allows businesses to share updates with the Foursquare users who frequent their business. So if a user has checked in to a business often — or liked it — they’ll be able to access the latest updates from that business via their ‘Friends’ tab whenever they’re in the same city as the establishment. This enables users to get the latest news from places where they’re loyal customers about things like new specials, products, or other promos. It also enables businesses to better connect with and cater to the customers that repeatedly bring them business. Local Updates is now available to all companies that have claimed their business on Foursquare. What Are Promoted Updates?Okay, now that we’ve gotten last week’s update out of the way, let’s talk about Foursquare’s latest announcement — Promoted Updates.Whereas Local Updates provide Foursquare users with a better way to keep up with the updates from businesses they already like, Promoted Updates help them discover new places. These updates look similar to Local Updates, except they can be found in Foursquare users’ ‘Explore’ tab, and businesses have to pay to promote them there. Get it? ‘Promoted Updates’? These updates can include anything from a money-saving special, news about a new product line, or a photo of a restaurant’s latest menu item.How Promoted Updates WorkFoursquare compares the way Promoted Updates work to the way Google AdWords works. In other words, if I searched for “Mexican food” in Google, I might see an ad for a Mexican restaurant in the PPC results. In Foursquare, similarly, searching for “Mexican food” in the ‘Explore’ tab might result in a Promoted Update from a local Mexican restaurant about its new summer menu items. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Facebook Launches New Mobile Design for Business Pages

first_img Originally published Apr 23, 2013 4:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 What’s New for Facebook Page Admins?In addition to design enhancements from the user’s perspective, Facebook’s updated mobile page layout also comes with some notable changes on the admin side of things …Pinned Posts Appear Higher Up: Ever since Facebook’s Timeline changes went into effect back in 2012, Facebook page admins have been able to pin important posts (including offers or videos) to the top of their Timeline using Facebook’s desktop version. With Facebook’s mobile update, this pinned content will now appear front and center when pages are accessed via mobile devices.Better Mobile Management: Facebook’s changes give page admins the ability to easily swap between public and admin views of their page directly through their mobile devices, enabling them to comment on posts with either their personal or business account. In addition, Facebook has also released a new layout for corporate pages that have both a central brand page as well as other local business pages. The parent page shows links to its child/local pages below the map so users can find the nearest location. These features are noticeable in Facebook’s images below: Topics: Big Wins for Local Business Marketers Although Facebook Page admins don’t have to do anything in order to activate the new layout for their mobile visitors, Facebook’s changes do have some implications for marketers — particularly local businesses.Aside from any possible motives of competing with more mobile-friendly local business-oriented apps like Yelp, Facebook’s changes all seem reactive to the need for making the mobile experience on brand pages much more utilitarian rather than social. It makes perfect sense, considering that mobile users accessing Facebook Pages are likely more interested in getting information about nearby local businesses than actually interacting with the content on the page — a behavior that makes much more sense for the desktop user.Given that the mobile design is much more focused on providing users with local business information, recommendations, and ratings than encouraging Timeline engagement, Facebook’s updates appear to be much more beneficial for the local business brand page than any other type. And because it’s possible that mobile users may start gravitating toward Facebook over other apps like Yelp (at least I’m sure that’s Facebook’s hope) for information about local businesses, it’s critical for local business marketers to make sure the information on their Facebook Page is accurate and up to date. It also wouldn’t hurt to start collecting positive reviews/recommendations and star ratings, either ;-)What do you think of Facebook’s new mobile page layout? How do you think it will affect Facebook mobile marketing? Facebook Updates If you’re the proud owner of a Facebook business page, your page’s mobile presence is about to get a makeover. Today, Facebook announced some design and layout improvements to the mobile version of Facebook Pages in response to the fact that half of Facebook Page visitors access those pages from their mobile devices. These updates are accessible starting today via mobile browsers and on the Facebook iOS app, with the changes coming soon to the Facebook Android app.The best thing about it? Facebook Page admins don’t have to do anything to optimize for it besides keeping the web version of their page complete and up to date. How’s that for easy optimization? Let’s review the changes to the Facebook Page mobile layout so you know what to expect both for yourself as a page admin, and for your mobile Facebook Page visitors.What’s New for Mobile Users?As you can see via the screenshots below from TechCrunch, there are a few noteworthy changes to the mobile version of Facebook Pages from the user perspective.Cleaner Look and Feel: The simplified layout is designed to give page visitors a much more mobile-friendly user experience.Easy Ways to Interact With the Page Overall: The new design features buttons for users to Like the page, check in, call the business, or click for more, which includes actions like sharing, sending a message, copying the page’s link, or reporting the page — right below the page’s cover photo and thumbnail.Most Useful, Relevant Information Featured Up Top: The new design aims to surface the important information closer to the top of the page so users don’t have to scroll to find critical info. This information includes a close-up map so users can quickly determine the business’ location in addition to the business’ address, distance from the user’s mobile location, hours of operation, price range, and a prominently featured average star rating.Below the fold, the layout includes reviews left by the user’s friends, and an option for users to add their own recommendations. Next, users see a large, slideshow-like album of photos from the page before finally viewing the page’s feed of Timeline posts.  Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

I’m Not You, You’re Not Me. So Why Do We Have the Same Internet?

first_img Topics: Fab is a fast-growing ecommerce company that made its name running daily flash sales. But this week the New York-based e-tailer announced a pretty big change: from now on Fab will drop the flash sales and instead enable its members to “follow what you love,” and only get information about things they care about. Moreover, “We’ll personalize your Fab experience on-site based on what you follow,” CEO Jason Goldberg announced in a blog post.The idea is to put users in control, enabling them to choose what kinds of things they’ll hear about and where they will get that information — mobile, email, onsite, etc. In other words: my Fab will be different from your Fab, which will be different from your best friend’s Fab.To each his or her own is the new motto of the internet. Everywhere you look, in every corner of every industry, companies are looking for ways to create products and experiences that are personalized and customized. “Context” has become the umbrella term, and for internet companies it has become the new Holy Grail.Just last week I met with a top executive at a Silicon Valley tech company whose engineers are working on what he calls “a contextual operating system.” One example of what this could do: when you’re sitting in a conference room with a bunch of people, your phone would know where it was, and who else was in the room with you. Your phone would know when it was in your pocket, and when it was out on the table, and could behave differently depending on where it is.The Age of ContextFab’s decision to double down on customization and personalization could become a model for others, including the news business, says Ranjan Roy, the co-founder of Informerly, a news site that tracks the ecommerce industry. “How come when I go to the NY Times homepage, except for a tiny `Recommended for You’ section way below the fold, I see the same articles as everyone else?” Roy wonders in a blog post titled, “Fab.com and the Future of News.”Maybe someday my New York Times will be different from your New York Times. We already see glimmers of this today. My Amazon.com homepage is not the same as yours, for example. Tech pundits Robert Scoble and Shel Israel are working on a book called “The Age of Context,” which they also believe is right around the corner and will represent a “transformative tsunami, one which will change work and life.”The ability to deliver personalized experiences in the context of who someone is, where they are, what they’re doing, when they’re doing it, and even why they’re doing it, will also force companies to rethink and reinvent their approach to marketing.This is a subject near and dear to our hearts at HubSpot, not only as it relates to our ecommerce solutions but also to the overall HubSpot product. Check out this video from last year’s INBOUND conference where our CEO, Brian Halligan, talked about using content to pull people toward your brand, and then using context to deliver an experience that’s tailored to their interests. (Skip to the 12:00 minute mark.)Says Halligan: “The way I think about the next six years of inbound marketing is if we use content to pull people in, pull people into our website, pull people into our front door, the next phase of inbound marketing is how do you use context to pull people through the funnel.” That was a year ago. You’ll hear even more about context from Halligan at this year’s INBOUND.The Filter BubbleA world that’s completely tailored to your interests could have some drawbacks, of course, chief among them the so-called “filter bubble” where people end up getting isolated by algorithms that only show them what they want to see. Thus conservatives get one kind of news, and liberals get another, that kind of thing. And sheltering people from viewpoints and opinions that differ from their own is a recipe for isolation.From a marketing and ecommerce perspective the filter bubble presents an analogous drawback, which is that you lose out on serendipity, the experience of discovering things outside your set of self-declared interests. Sites like Amazon are great at doing the “If you liked that, then you’ll probably also like this” kind of comparison. It’s wonderful, but it also can have a narrowing effect.But fear not. Techies are already aware of this, and working on ways to address it. What would be really great is a dashboard that lets people dial in how much or how little serendipity they want. After the Age of Content, and the Age of Context, maybe we could call this the Age of Control.How much personalization do you want — as a marketer, and as a consumer? Originally published Jul 17, 2013 2:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 Personalization in Marketing Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img