Hockey coach suspended for hazing

first_img Downie left the team and has threatened to sit out the season if the Spitfires do not trade him. Aliu also demanded a trade. Mantha played for 12 seasons as a defenseman in the NHL with Winnipeg, Pittsburgh, Edmonton, Minnesota and Philadelphia. He had 81 goals, 289 assists and 501 penalty minutes. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! The Spitfires also have been fined $35,000. The punishments were announced Tuesday by Ontario Hockey League commissioner David Branch. WINDSOR, Ontario — A former NHL player has been suspended as general manager and coach of a major junior team over a hazing incident and player fighting. Moe Mantha of the OHL’s Windsor Spitfires was banned for one year as general manager and 25 games as coach for making players strip on the team bus. He also got a 15-game ban from coaching for fights in practice between Akim Aliu and Steve Downie. center_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week “The league has a zero-tolerance policy on hazing and the league must make a very strong statement against it,” Branch said. “Any form of hazing must be eradicated.” He said the league needed to show it is serious about hazing and to assure players and their parents that the OHL will do all it can to provide “a healthy environment” for its players. The league will also arrange a meeting between players, their parents and the families players are billeted with to discuss the hazing. The team will make a psychologist available to any player who wants it, he added. The OHL says the hazing involved making players strip and stand in a small lavatory at the rear of the team bus. The Spitfires suspended Downie for five games and ordered him to participate in a personal counseling program. Aliu received a one-game suspension and must also attend counseling sessions. last_img read more

Red carpet rolled out as Indonesian president arrives

first_imgIndonesian president Joko Widodo. Photo: UNBA red carpet was rolled out at Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport as Indonesian president Joko Widodo arrived in Dhaka on Saturday afternoon on a two-day visit, reports news agency UNB.Joko Widodo arrived here at the invitation of president Abdul Hamid.On his arrival at the airport by a special flight of Republic Indonesia at 4:20 pm, the Indonesian president was received by his Bangladesh counterpart and his wife first lady Rashida Khanam.A smartly turned out contingent comprising members of Bangladesh Army, Air Force and Bangladesh Navy gave guard of honour to the Indonesian president. He was welcomed with a 21-gun salute.Cabinet members, including foreign minister Abul Hassan Mahmood Ali, State Minister for Foreign Affairs Mohammed Shahriar Alam, commerce minister Tofail Ahmed, industries minister Amir Hossain Amu, and secretaries concerned to the president’s House, dean of the diplomatic corps, the chiefs of the three services, the inspector general of police (IGP), were present.Two tiny tots presented bouquets to president Joko and his wife Iriana Widodo.After the warm reception at the airport, the president was taken to Sonargaon Hotel in a ceremonial motorcade where he will be staying during the visit.The Indonesian president will visit Rohingya camps in Cox’s Bazar district on Sunday.Foreign minister AH Mahmood Ali will meet the Indonesian president at Sonargaon Hotel at 6:30pm on Saturday.President Abdul Hamid will host dinner in honour of his Indonesian counterpart at Bangabhaban in the evening.On Sunday morning, the Indonesian President will visit Savar National Mausoleum to pay homage to martyrs of Liberation War.He will also visit Bangabandhu Museum at Dhanmondi to pay respect to Father of the Nation Bangabandhu Sheikh Munibur Rahman.The Indonesian president will have official talks with prime minister Sheikh Hasina at her office at 10:00am on Sunday.President Widodo will leave for Cox’s Bazar to meet Rohingyas at 12:10pm. He will leave Cox’s Bazar for Dhaka at 4:15pm.President Widodo will leave Dhaka for Afghanistan on Monday morning at 9:00am.The Indonesian president will discuss bilateral, regional and global issues, including the Rohingya one, during his Bangladesh visit.Prime minister Sheikh Hasina visited Indonesia in 2015 and 2017, and invited the Indonesian president to visit Bangladesh.In September last, Indonesian foreign minister Retno Marsudi visited Dhaka and discussed the Rohingya issues.last_img read more

Ostriches run fast because of springy tendons

first_imgAustralian and U.S. researchers studying the movement of ostriches have discovered the giant flightless birds can store double the elastic energy per step in their tendons than humans can. This considerably reduces the effort needed by the muscles, and enables the ostrich (and perhaps also the emu) to run twice as fast as humans while requiring only half the energy. China hatches 150 African ostriches Human and ostrich hind-limb postures during mid-stance of running: (a,b) sagittal plane; (c,d) frontal plane. Image: [i]Journal of the Royal Society Interface[/i], doi:10.1098/​rsif.2010.0466 Citation: Ostriches run fast because of ‘springy’ tendons (2010, October 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-10-ostriches-fast-springy-tendons.html Leader of the study, Assistant Professor Jonas Rubenson of the School of Sports Science, Exercise and Health at the University of Western Australia, said the aim of the research was to find out what mechanical adaptations were made by species able to run fast and efficiently. He said that while lions and cheetahs can outrun the ostrich on short sprints, they use a great deal of energy, and other species such as ostriches, antelopes and horses, can run fast over long distances.Two hypotheses had been proposed to explain how some animals are able to run economically: the first was that they used a particularly efficient mechanical action in their limbs, and the second was the animals were able to store more elastic energy in their joints than sprinters.To test these hypotheses the researchers fitted reflective markers to the joints of five humans and five tame ostriches to enable them to carry out a detailed analysis of their gait and movements as they ran on a custom-built running track 50 meters long. They also measured the forces applied to the ground during running. They selected the ostrich rather than the lighter Australian emu because the ostrich and humans have a similar mass, and because the ostrich is the fastest bird on the land.The results demonstrated that both humans and ostriches need the almost exactly the same amount of mechanical work to swing their limbs during running, and the major difference was in the storage and release of energy by the tendons. They calculated the release of this elastic energy generated 83% more work in the ostrich than in the human, which meant the ostrich uses less metabolic energy and is less fatigued.The findings of the research, described in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, may enable engineers to design better prosthetic limbs by focusing on elastic propulsion. They could also help robot researchers to design more agile robots. The results could also provide some insight into the evolution of bipedalism. More information: Adaptations for economical bipedal running: the effect of limb structure on three-dimensional joint mechanics, Journal of the Royal Society Interface, Published online before print October 28, 2010, doi:10.1098/​rsif.2010.0466 © 2010 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore furtherlast_img read more

Texting and Driving Not So Fast General Motors is Watching You

first_imgSeptember 2, 2014 2 min read This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Nowcenter_img Companies like Tesla and Google have their eyes on self-driving cars. But while humans are still behind the wheel, General Motors is turning to eye-tracking, facial recognition tech to make the streets a bit safer.The Financial Times reports GM is planning to install machines in about half a million cars that will track drivers’ eye and head movements to cut down on distracted and tired driving. GM would be the first automobile maker to include this type of tech on a wide scale. Related: Pair of Apple Patents Aims to Answer: ‘Where’d I Park My Car?’The tracking devices GM would be using are made by an Australian company called Seeing Machines. In a release today, Seeing Machines announced a partnership with Takata, a Japanese auto safety company, noting “Takata has recently secured a contract to deliver its first ever mass-manufactured implementation of a drive-monitoring system.”Last year, Seeing Machines signed a deal with construction vehicle manufacturer Caterpillar to install systems in 40,000 of the company’s mining trucks that sense when drivers aren’t looking at the road or are falling asleep at the wheel and alert them with an alarm and a vibrating seat.Related: Building a Peer-to-Peer Car Sharing Network at Age 27The move comes at a time when both GM and Takata have faced a good deal of scrutiny. Last week, Honda recalled 63,200 cars due to defective Takata air bag inflators, following similiar recalls from Toyota, BMW and GM.  GM CEO Mary Barra appeared before Congress this summer in hearings about the company’s delayed recall of cars with a faulty ignition switch.The emphasis on driver safety makes sense, but Seeing Machine’s investment in sensing technology that can monitor a driver’s vital signs will no doubt raise concerns about privacy.  Seeing Machines and General Motors did not respond to a request for comment.Related: How $10,000 Can Score You a Self-Driving Car (Sort Of) Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more