Community Drive! Luckbox appoints Sujoy Roy as esports director

first_img Related Articles Luckbox: How the return of live sport has affected esports betting July 10, 2020 Luckbox outlines final TSXV roadmap July 29, 2020 Share GG.Bet scores ESL Counter-Strike & Dota 2 global partnerships July 15, 2020 Share Submit StumbleUpon Sujoy Roy – LuckboxUpdating the market, industry esports betting start-up Luckbox (luckbox.com) has confirmed the appointment of Sujoy Roy as its first Director of Esports.Roy joins the Luckbox executive team, from leading global esports tournament organiser ESL, where he led player community development initiatives and audience engagement strategies.A seasoned esports executive, Roy has been tasked with developing Luckbox’s founding community initiatives, fostering partnerships with initial operator stakeholders, and helping bridge esports-to-betting dynamics.Ahead of its planned 2018 product launch, Luckbox has significantly expanded its executive and corporate advisory team, as the company seeks to revolutionise esports wagering.This April, Luckbox confirmed the senior appointments of former PokerStars executives Quentin Martin (COO) and Vadim Soloveychik as first marketing lead.In his new role, Roy will be supported by esports figurehead and corporate advisory Paul ‘Redeye’ Chaloner, as Luckbox seeks to crack esports betting dynamics, which the start-up believes have been significantly underserved by current industry incumbents.“I’ve seen so many companies try to do esports and make a mess of it. I want to help Luckbox avoid the common pitfalls and make a product that works as part of the esports infrastructure. It’s important to understand how and why people watch or play games.” Roy commented on joining Luckbox.“If Luckbox can create a great betting platform and do it sympathetically with the community it could be a big help to the industry.”Backing the appointment of Roy, Vadim Soloveychik, CMO at Luckbox, said: ‘We are excited to welcome Sujoy at Luckbox.“His deep knowledge of the industry and community will play a big role in helping us to deliver an authentic experience for esport fans and become preferred esports betting platform.”last_img read more

Injuries stand in the way of Egypt’s AFCON hopes

first_imgAction in the group stage match, Egypt versus Uganda 10pm: Egypt vs Burkina Faso – Weary Pharoash seek another semi-final triumphLibreville, Gabon | AFP | Weariness will worry Egypt as they seek to extend an Africa Cup of Nations semi-finals winning streak to six matches by beating Burkina Faso in Libreville Wednesday.Surprise survivors Burkina Faso overcame Tunisia in the first quarter-final last Saturday evening, more than 24 hours before Egypt edged Morocco in the last.Many pundits believe this could give the west Africans an advantage at Stade de l’Amitie in the Gabonese capital, especially if the match went to extra time.Argentina-born Egypt coach Hector Cuper admitted he was concerned about the shorter recovery time his team have compared to Burkina Faso.“It is not an ideal situation, but we have no choice but to adapt,” said the greying 61-year-old former Valencia and Inter Millan manager.“The players will be given time to rehabilitate and hopefully they will be ready come Wednesday night.”A calf injury rules out Arsenal midfielder Mohamed Elneny and striker Marwan Mohsen is a doubtful starter owing to a knee problem.Despite the disadvantages, record seven-time African champions Egypt will be expected to continue a remarkably successful semi-finals run spanning 31 years.The Pharaohs eliminated Morocco (1986), Burkina Faso (1998), Senegal (2006), the Ivory Coast (2008) and Algeria (2010) to reach finals, all of which they won.Egypt have reserved some of their finest performances for the last-four stage, thrashing Didier Drogba-led Ivory Coast 4-1 in Ghana and Algeria 4-0 in Angola.A wide winning margin against the Burkinabe Stallions is unlikely, however, as Egypt have clawed rather than cruised past opponents in Gabon.Following a 0-0 draw with Mali, they achieved three consecutive 1-0 victories against Uganda, 2015 runners-up Ghana and Herve Renard-coached Morocco.– Rock solid defence – While scoring only three goals — an average of one every 120 minutes — must trouble Cuper, his team are the only one not to concede a goal in this tournament.Much credit for that goes to goalkeeper Essam El Hadary, who turned 44 this month and became the oldest footballer to play at a Cup of Nations.“He is first on to the training field and the last to leave,” said Cuper in admiration of an Egyptian chasing a fifth Cup of Nations winners’ medal.El Hadary was part of the squad that went to Burkina Faso 19 years ago, and beat the hosts 2-0 in the semi-finals en route to lifting the trophy.Morocco did give the veteran shot-stopper moments of severe anxiety from crosses — a fact that will not have gone unnoticed by Burkina Faso coach Paulo Duarte.Given the outstanding semi-finals record of Egypt, the Portuguese handler studiously avoided making any gung-ho predictions.“We dream of doing better than in 2013,” he said, referring to the 1-0 final defeat by Nigeria in South Africa after a giant-killing run.“My team is capable of producing fantastic football. There is quality and confidence among the boys.”Like Egypt, Burkina Faso enter the semi-finals boasting an unbeaten record after victories over Guinea-Bissau and Tunisia and draws against Cameroon and Gabon.Goalkeeper Herve Koffi, 24 years younger than El Hadary, has conceded two goals, but none from open play.Cameroon captain Benjamin Moukandjo beat him with a free-kick and 2015 African Footballer of the Year and Gabon captain Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang converted a penalty.In front of Koffi, Burkina Faso have an experienced ‘spine’ in Bakary Kone, captain Charles Kabore, Prejuce Nakoulma and supersub Aristide Bance.Cameroon and Ghana, both four-time African champions, meet Thursday in the second semi-final in southeastern city Franceville.Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

French Open Showdown: Serena vs. Sharapova

first_imgSerena Williams of the U.S. clenches her fist after scoring against Italy’s Sara Errani, defeating Errani in two sets 6-0, 6-1, in their semifinal match at the French Open tennis tournament, at Roland Garros stadium in Paris, June 6. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)  by Howard FendrichAP Tennis WriterPARIS (AP) — For a decade, the French Open has presented more problems for Serena Williams than any of the other Grand Slam tournaments.Her collection of 15 major championships includes five from Wimbledon, five from the Australian Open, four from the U.S. Open … and one from Roland Garros.Ever since she beat her sister in the 2002 final in Paris, starting a run of four consecutive titles at tennis’ most important events, one thing or another has prevented Williams from a second French Open trophy. She’d love to change that by beating defending champion Maria Sharapova in Saturday’s final.“It would be awesome for me,” Williams said. “I don’t think there’s anything that can describe how happy I would be.”When asked whether she now feels comfortable on the tournament’s red clay courts, Williams replied: “Incidentally, I have always felt really comfortable. I just haven’t done great.”Her history at the tournament has been filled with tough times and earlier-than-expected departures.In 2003, her 33-match Grand Slam winning streak ended with a three-set loss to Justine Henin in a semifinal marked by Henin’s gamesmanship, a mean-spirited crowd that cheered Williams’ faults, and the American’s post-match tears.In 2004, Williams lost in three sets to Jennifer Capriati in the quarterfinals, the same round that saw her bid adieu in 2007 (against Henin again), 2009 (Svetlana Kuznetsova) and 2010 (Sam Stosur). Williams lost in the third round in 2008, and missed the French Open in 2005, 2006 and 2010 with various health problems.Last year brought the most surprising defeat of all, against 111th-ranked Virginie Razzano of France, the only first-round exit for Williams in 51 career Grand Slam appearances.“She was so mad,” Williams’ mother, Oracene Price, recalled Thursday.Instead of sulking, Williams got right back to work, sticking around Paris — where she owns an apartment — and training at coach Patrick Moratouglou’s tennis academy. How did that work out? Well, since that Razzano match, Williams is 73-3, with titles at Wimbledon, the U.S. Open, the London Olympics and the WTA Championships last season, along with a tour-leading five titles so far in 2013. At 31, she is the oldest woman to be ranked No. 1.last_img read more