Washington driver had Pokemon Go open on eight phones at once

first_imgIs there a Pokemon named DontDoThis? Maybe there should be. On Tuesday, a driver in Washington state was found parked on the shoulder of State Route 518 in the Seattle suburb of Burien. With him were eight smartphones, all opened to the Pokemon Go app. BUSTED! More Pokemon news Gotta eat ’em all at the Pokemon Cafe 13 Photos Pokemon Go #PokemonDistraction Sergeant Kyle Smith contacted a vehicle on the shoulder yesterday evening. This is what was next to the driver! Playing #PokemonGO with EIGHT (8) phones! Driver agreed to put phones in back seat and continued his commute with 8 less distractions. pic.twitter.com/tgOr16CRlm— Trooper Rick Johnson (@wspd2pio) August 14, 2019 The man put his gaming rig out of reach, and lived to play another day.But distracted driving has caused accidents before.”I can remember only one collision that we were able to confirm was caused by the driver playing Pokemon Go, (who) rear-ended another vehicle,” Johnson told me. “I am assuming there are more, but humans don’t self-report that often when we arrive at scenes to investigate.”(Hat tip to Seattle-based GeekWire for spotting this story.) Gotta soak ’em all! Pokemon Go hunter falls into pond while playing Norway’s prime minister caught playing Pokemon Go in parliament College students move one step closer to majoring in Pokemon Go Preview • The ultimate guide to everything Pokemon Go Pokemon Gocenter_img How To • Harry Potter: Wizards Unite best Pokemon Go every way but one News • Pokemon Sleep is Pokemon Go but for bedtime Share your voice 1 Culture Gaming Tags Comment Trooper Rick Johnson of the Washington State Patrol told me the man wasn’t driving while he played the eight different screens — his car was parked. But the overenthusiastic gamer was informed that the shoulder of a busy highway is meant for breakdowns or flat tires or the like. Not pulling over so you can pitch Pokeballs at a Snorlax.”Sgt. (Kyle) Smith asked him to put the phones in his back seat and continue on, as the shoulder is only for emergency parking,” Johnson told me.As you can see, the driver seems well-prepped for octo-play. His phones, of varying sizes, were all nestled into what looks like a homemade foam case that holds them all steady. Each screen was open to the gaming app. last_img read more

Black Candidates Are Missing in Ward 6 DC Council Race

first_imgBy James Wright, Special to the AFRO, jwright@afro.comOne of the District of Columbia’s most active political and cultural wards has a Black population over one-third and yet there are no Black candidates for that council seat this year.Ward 6 encompasses the U.S. Capitol, the popular Eastern Market, gentrifying Shaw and the booming Southwest Waterfront that includes the Nationals Major League Baseball Stadium. It is 51 percent White, 35 percent Black and the rest Latino and others. The ward is represented by Charles Allen (D), who is White, and he believes his jurisdiction has matured beyond voting for candidates based solely on race.Charles Allen represents Ward 6 on the D.C. Council. (Courtesy Photo)“I appreciate the strong African-American leadership that is in my ward,” Allen told the AFRO. “As a council member, I am supposed to represent all of my constituents regardless of their race and deal with issues that matter to all residents.”Allen has supported strong criminal justice reform on the council, making the system more humane for juvenile offenders, and wants more affordable housing in the District and modernizing school buildings. “These are issues that resonate for all Ward 6 residents and for working families and that includes African-American families,” he said.Allen is seeking re-election to a second term on the D.C. Council and faces one opponent, Lisa Hunter in the June 19 Democratic primary. Allen will face a Republican, Mike Bekesha, in the Nov. 6 general election.Hunter, who is part Jewish and part Latina, told the AFRO she will focus on affordable housing, job training and attainment and improving access to the District’s maternal and prenatal care system for African Americans in Ward 6.African-American Nadine Winter (D) was elected as the first Ward 6 council member in 1974 and she served until 1991 when she was defeated by another African American, Harold Brazil (D). Brazil ran for an at-large position on the council in 1996 and served in that capacity until 2005.When Brazil was elected at-large, his Ward 6 position was won by Sharon Ambrose, the first White woman to hold the position. Ambrose was followed by Tommy Wells (D) and Allen, who was elected in 2014.In 2014, Allen defeated African-American Darrel Thompson in the Democratic Primary. Thompson chose not to seek a rematch this year but said the lack of a Black candidate is less a matter of race than an issue of getting involved in the political process.“If people want to run for political office, they should run regardless of race,” Thompson told the AFRO. “It is good when people of different backgrounds become candidates. It makes the political process competitive and the voting public is exposed to a full range of ideas.”Francis Campbell, a former advisory neighborhood commissioner in Ward 6, told the AFRO he hasn’t decided who he will support for the Ward 6 position. “Many of the newer residents of the ward, who tend to be White, aren’t cognizant of the contributions of the long-term residents,” he said. In District lingo, older residents tend to mean Blacks and newer mean White and younger.Campbell said when his Black neighbors go to meetings in the ward they become frustrated when there is talk about dog parks and not about economic development and public safety issues that should be addressed. In some ways, Campbell doesn’t blame the new residents entirely. “The new residents do have more resources and the African Americans in the ward aren’t as cohesive as they should be,” he said.last_img read more