High On Fire Win Best Metal Performance For Electric Messiah 2019 GRAMMYs

first_img Who Is Eligible For The Best New Artist GRAMMY? Who Will Voters Pick For Best Latin Pop Album? High On Fire wins Best Metal Performance at the 61st GRAMMY Awards Jennifer VelezGRAMMYs Feb 10, 2019 – 5:55 pm High On Fire won Best Metal Performance for “Electric Messiah” at the  61st GRAMMY Awards.”Wow what a trip. I guess first thing I’d like to do is thank these guys,” front man Mike Pike said looking at his band members, Des Kensel and Jeff Matz. “We never really needed an award for doing what we loved 21 years later, finally got this. Thank you to the Academy.”Between The Buried And Me (“Condemned To The Gallows”), Deafheaven (“Honeycomb”), Trivium (“Betrayer”), and Underoath (“On My Teeth”) were the other nominees in the category.  2019 GRAMMYs: Full Nominees And Winners List Cardi BPhoto: Dan MacMedan/WireImage Artists React To Their 2019 GRAMMY Nominations Cardi BPhoto: Dan MacMedan/WireImage Who Is Eligible For The Best New Artist GRAMMY? 2019 GRAMMY Awards Red Carpet High On Fire Win Best Metal Performance high-fire-win-best-metal-performance-electric-messiah-2019-grammys Relive GRAMMY Week 2019 In Pictures Kacey MusgravesPhoto: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images Poll: Who Do You Want To See On The Red Carpet? Lady GagaPhoto: Christopher Polk/Getty Images BTSPhoto: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images Poll: Who Do You Want To See On The Red Carpet? 2019 GRAMMY Awards Telecast | Photo Gallery Photo: studioEAST/Getty Images Amy Winehouse Best New Artist winner for 2007 | Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images Who Will Voters Pick For Best Latin Pop Album? TLC Photo: Alison Buck/Getty Images Who’s Nominated For Song Of The Year? Photo: studioEAST/Getty Images John BillingsPhoto: Jesse Grant/WireImage/Getty Images Record Of The Year 61st GRAMMY Award Nominees Best New Artist Nominees Revealed | 61st GRAMMYs Twitter TLC Photo: Alison Buck/Getty Images Album Of The Year vs. Record Of The Year Explained Who Will Voters Pick For Best Pop Album? 2019 GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony 61st GRAMMY Awards: Full Nominees & Winners List Artists React To Their 2019 GRAMMY Nominations Facebook H.E.R.Photo by Prince Williams/Wireimage Amy Winehouse Best New Artist winner for 2007 | Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images Album Of The Year Nominees | 61st GRAMMY Awards Who Will Voters Pick For Best Latin Pop Album? John BillingsPhoto: Jesse Grant/WireImage/Getty Images Who’s Nominated For Song Of The Year? Album Of The Year Nominees | 61st GRAMMY Awards Poll: Who Will Voters Choose For Best Rap Album? Lady GagaPhoto: Christopher Polk/Getty Images Poll: Who Do You Want To See On The Red Carpet? Backstage At The 2019 GRAMMYs | Photo Gallery Email Best New Artist Nominees Revealed | 61st GRAMMYs 5 Ways BTS Won Our Hearts At The 2019 GRAMMYs Photo: studioEAST/Getty Images Who Will Voters Pick For Best Rap Performance? Read more 5 Ways BTS Won Our Hearts At The 2019 GRAMMYs Meet The GRAMMY Man: How GRAMMYs Are Made Prev Next H.E.R.Photo by Prince Williams/Wireimage Relive GRAMMY Week 2019 In Pictures John BillingsPhoto: Jesse Grant/WireImage/Getty Images Who Will Voters Pick For Best Pop Album?center_img Record Of The Year 61st GRAMMY Award Nominees Who Will Voters Choose For Best Alternative Album? Kacey MusgravesPhoto: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images Who Will Voters Pick For Best Pop Album? Album Of The Year vs. Record Of The Year Explained High On Fire Win Best Metal Performance For “Electric Messiah” | 2019 GRAMMYs Brandi Carlile, H.E.R. To Play The 61st GRAMMYs Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images Who’s Nominated For Song Of The Year? Amy Winehouse Best New Artist winner for 2007 | Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images Artists React To Their 2019 GRAMMY Nominations 2019 GRAMMY Awards Red Carpet Meet The GRAMMY Man: How GRAMMYs Are Made H.E.R.Photo by Prince Williams/Wireimage 2019 GRAMMY Awards Telecast | Photo Gallery 61st GRAMMYs: Here’s Your Apple Music Playlist Who Will Voters Choose For Best Alternative Album? Cardi B, Post Malone Among 2019 GRAMMYs Performers Brandi Carlile, H.E.R. To Play The 61st GRAMMYs Album Of The Year Nominees | 61st GRAMMY Awards Kacey MusgravesPhoto: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images Relive GRAMMY Week 2019 In Pictures Backstage At The 2019 GRAMMYs | Photo Gallery Cardi BPhoto: Dan MacMedan/WireImage 61st GRAMMYs: Here’s Your Apple Music Playlist BTSPhoto: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images BTSPhoto: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images 2019 GRAMMY Awards Telecast | Photo Gallery Best New Artist Nominees Revealed | 61st GRAMMYs 2019 GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images Cardi B, Post Malone Among 2019 GRAMMYs Performers Poll: Who Will Voters Choose For Best Rap Album? 61st GRAMMYs: Here’s Your Apple Music Playlist News TLC Photo: Alison Buck/Getty Images Meet The GRAMMY Man: How GRAMMYs Are Made 2019 GRAMMY Awards Red Carpet Album Of The Year vs. Record Of The Year Explained 5 Ways BTS Won Our Hearts At The 2019 GRAMMYs Who Will Voters Pick For Best Rap Performance? Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images 61st GRAMMY Awards: Full Nominees & Winners List Record Of The Year 61st GRAMMY Award Nominees Who Is Eligible For The Best New Artist GRAMMY? 61st GRAMMY Awards 61st GRAMMY Awards: Full Nominees & Winners List Who Will Voters Pick For Best Rap Performance? Who Will Voters Choose For Best Alternative Album? 2019 GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony Brandi Carlile, H.E.R. To Play The 61st GRAMMYs Poll: Who Will Voters Choose For Best Rap Album? Lady GagaPhoto: Christopher Polk/Getty Images Cardi B, Post Malone Among 2019 GRAMMYs Performers Backstage At The 2019 GRAMMYs | Photo Gallerylast_img read more

Shakib Al Hasans wife lashes out at media for their hatred against

first_imgShakib Al Hasan found himself in a controversyIANSA controversy erupted in Bangladesh’s cricket circle after former captain and one of the most important members of the national team, Shakib Al Hasan missed the official photo-shoot for the World Cup-bound squad. The entire group of cricketers selected to represent their county in the mega event had gathered at the Sher-e-Bangla stadium in Dhaka along with officials from the Bangladesh Cricket Board (BCB). However the left-handed all-rounder left the venue before the shoot commenced and received flak for it.Now, his wife, Sakib Ummey Al Hasan, has come out in his defence through a Facebook post where she lashed out at the media for targeting her husband. In a long statement on the social media site, she claimed that some journalists have ‘hatred’ against her husband and are therefore vilifying him.”I really have nothing to say about the journalists (on) why they have so much hatred against Shakib Al Hasan. I think it’s actually our fault (that) we failed to invite them over for dinner or lunch to butter them (up or) chat with them for hours or give them inside news,” she wrote.BCB chief expresses disappointmentMeanwhile, the chief of BCB, Nazmul Hasan Papon expressed his disappointment with the no-show of the former skipper. “It is disappointing, what else can I say? It was the team’s photo session. I called him and he said he is going to come to my house at night. I said to him to come to the ground. He said he had already left. I asked everyone here, and they said Shakib was informed of the photo session. He didn’t turn up for training but we hoped for his presence in the photo session. But he wasn’t here,” he explained. Shakib Al Hasan is, possibly, the most valuable player in the entire teamIANSExplanation by wifeBut the wife of the 32-year old cricketer asserted that he missed the photo-shoot due to a misunderstanding. “Now the topic is why wasn’t he in the World Cup photo session? First of all it is his miss but he did not do that on purpose. He has (sic) misread the message that was sent! And he apologised to the officials, sorry we didn’t make any videos to prove!” she claimed.Her ire was also directed towards a particular show on a television channel where the famous cricketer was criticised. “Second topic, Channel24 the (sic) show ‘Beyond the Gallery’ put up a show with 2 journalists strictly to put him down saying many absurd things. One of the many is that, ‘he’s doing this to gain fame.’ Are bhai, if I’m not wrong that’s the last thing he needs. Maybe it’s the other way around. Maybe you wanna gain fame by talking negative because businesswise, that’s profitable and (good) for your profile also! Now if it’s about his behaviour, ask any player how he is personally and internally, out (of the) field and on field! World Cup is in near future. Let him be there (and there are) many other things, I think, is (sic) going on for you to talk about!”This will be the fourth World Cup for the veteran Bangladesh cricketer. In the past, his left-arm spin and middle-order batting exploits have played a key role in helping Bangladesh become a force in international cricket. Having him in good form is a must for the Tigers’ success.last_img read more

Final tally shows over 10000 Rohingyas killed

first_imgThe ruins of a market which was set on fire are seen at a Rohingya village outside Maugndaw in Rakhine state. Photo: ReutersMohib Bullah is not your typical human rights investigator. He chews betel and he lives in a rickety hut made of plastic and bamboo. Sometimes, he can be found standing in a line for rations at the Rohingya refugee camp where he lives in Bangladesh.Yet Mohib Bullah is among a group of refugees who have achieved something that aid groups, foreign governments and journalists have not. They have painstakingly pieced together, name-by-name, the only record of Rohingya Muslims who were allegedly killed in a brutal crackdown by Myanmar’s military.The bloody assault in the western state of Rakhine drove more than 700,000 of the minority Rohingya people across the border into Bangladesh, and left thousands of dead behind.Aid agency Médecins Sans Frontières, working in Cox’s Bazar at the southern tip of Bangladesh, estimated in the first month of violence, beginning at the end of August 2017, that at least 6,700 Rohingya were killed. But the survey, in what is now the largest refugee camp in the world, was limited to the one month and didn’t identify individuals.The Rohingya list makers pressed on and their final tally put the number killed at more than 10,000. Their lists, which include the toll from a previous bout of violence in October 2016, catalogue victims by name, age, father’s name, address in Myanmar, and how they were killed.“When I became a refugee I felt I had to do something,” says Mohib Bullah, 43, who believes that the lists will be historical evidence of atrocities that could otherwise be forgotten.Myanmar government officials did not answer phone calls seeking comment on the Rohingya lists. Late last year, Myanmar’s military said that 13 members of the security forces had been killed. It also said it recovered the bodies of 376 Rohingya militants between 25 August and 5 September, which is the day the army says its offensive against the militants officially ended.Rohingya regard themselves as native to Rakhine State. But a 1982 law restricts citizenship for the Rohingya and other minorities not considered members of one of Myanmar’s “national races”. Rohingya were excluded from Myanmar’s last nationwide census in 2014, and many have had their identity documents stripped from them or nullified, blocking them from voting in the landmark 2015 elections. The government refuses even to use the word “Rohingya,” instead calling them “Bengali” or “Muslim.”Now in Bangladesh and able to organise without being closely monitored by Myanmar’s security forces, the Rohingya have armed themselves with lists of the dead and pictures and video of atrocities recorded on their mobile phones, in a struggle against attempts to erase their history in Myanmar.The Rohingya accuse the Myanmar army of rapes and killings across northern Rakhine, where scores of villages were burnt to the ground and bulldozed after attacks on security forces by Rohingya insurgents. The United Nations has said Myanmar’s military may have committed genocide.Myanmar says what it calls a “clearance operation” in the state was a legitimate response to terrorist attacks.Rohingya Muslim men with their hands bound kneel as members of the Myanmar security forces stand guard in Inn Din village. Photo: ReutersName by nameClad in longyis, traditional Burmese wrap-arounds tied at the waist, and calling themselves the Arakan Rohingya Society for Peace & Human Rights, the list makers say they are all too aware of accusations by the Myanmar authorities and some foreigners that Rohingya refugees invent stories of tragedy to win global support.But they insist that when listing the dead they err on the side of under-estimation.Mohib Bullah, who was previously an aid worker, gives as an example the riverside village of Tula Toli in Maungdaw district, where – according to Rohingya who fled – more than 1,000 were killed. “We could only get 750 names, so we went with 750,” he said.“We went family by family, name by name,” he added. “Most information came from the affected family, a few dozen cases came from a neighbour, and a few came from people from other villages when we couldn’t find the relatives.”In their former lives, the Rohingya list makers were aid workers, teachers and religious scholars. Now after escaping to become refugees, they say they are best placed to chronicle the events that took place in northern Rakhine, which is out-of-bounds for foreign media, except on government-organised trips.“Our people are uneducated and some people may be confused during the interviews and investigations,” said Mohammed Rafee, a former administrator in the village of Kyauk Pan Du who has worked on the lists. But taken as a whole, he said, the information collected was “very reliable and credible.”Sprawling projectGetting the full picture is difficult in the teeming dirt lanes of the refugee camps. Crowds of people gather to listen – and add their comments – amid booming calls to prayer from makeshift mosques and deafening downpours of rain. Even something as simple as a date can prompt an argument.What began tentatively in the courtyard of a mosque after Friday prayers one day last November became a sprawling project that drew in dozens of people and lasted months.The project has its flaws. The handwritten lists were compiled by volunteers, photocopied, and passed from person to person. The list makers asked questions in Rohingya about villages whose official names were Burmese, and then recorded the information in English. The result was a jumble of names: for example, there were about 30 different spellings for the village of Tula Toli.Wrapped in newspaper pages and stored on a shelf in the backroom of a clinic, the lists that Reuters reviewed were labeled as beginning in October 2016, the date of a previous exodus of Rohingya from Rakhine. There were also a handful of entries dated 2015 and 2012. And while most of the dates were European-style, with the day first and then the month, some were American-style, the other way around. So it wasn’t possible to be sure if an entry was, say, 9 May or 5 September.Aerial view of a burnt Rohingya village near Maungdaw. Photo: ReutersIt is also unclear how many versions of the lists there are. During interviews with Reuters, Rohingya refugees sometimes produced crumpled, handwritten or photocopied papers from shirt pockets or folds of their longyis.The list makers say they have given summaries of their findings, along with repatriation demands, to most foreign delegations, including those from the United Nations Fact-Finding Mission, who have visited the refugee camps. A legacy for survivorsThe list makers became more organised as weeks of labour rolled into months. They took over three huts and held meetings, bringing in a table, plastic chairs, a laptop and a large banner carrying the group’s name.The MSF survey was carried out to determine how many people might need medical care, so the number of people killed and injured mattered, and the identity of those killed was not the focus. It is nothing like the mini-genealogy with many individual details that was produced by the Rohingya.Mohib Bullah and some of his friends say they drew up the lists as evidence of crimes against humanity they hope will eventually be used by the International Criminal Court, but others simply hope that the endeavour will return them to the homes they lost in Myanmar.“If I stay here a long time my children will wear jeans. I want them to wear longyi. I do not want to lose my traditions. I do not want to lose my culture,” said Mohammed Zubair, one of the list makers. “We made the documents to give to the UN We want justice so we can go back to Myanmar.”Matt Wells, a senior crisis advisor for Amnesty International, said he has seen refugees in some conflict-ridden African countries make similar lists of the dead and arrested but the Rohingya undertaking was more systematic. “I think that’s explained by the fact that basically the entire displaced population is in one confined location,” he said.Wells said he believes the lists will have value for investigators into possible crimes against humanity.“In villages where we’ve documented military attacks in detail, the lists we’ve seen line up with witness testimonies and other information,” he said.Spokespeople at the ICC’s registry and prosecutors’ offices, which are closed for summer recess, did not immediately provide comment in response to phone calls and emails from Reuters.The US State Department also documented alleged atrocities against Rohingya in an investigation that could be used to prosecute Myanmar’s military for crimes against humanity, US officials have told Reuters. For that and the MSF survey only a small number of the refugees were interviewed, according to a person who worked on the State Department survey and based on published MSF methodology.MSF did not respond to requests for comment on the Rohingya lists. The US State Department declined to share details of its survey and said it wouldn’t speculate on how findings from any organization might be used.For Mohammed Suleman, a shopkeeper from Tula Toli, the Rohingya lists are a legacy for his five-year-old daughter. He collapsed, sobbing, as he described how she cries every day for her mother, who was killed along with four other daughters.“One day she will grow up. She may be educated and want to know what happened and when. At that time I may also have died,” he said. “If it is written in a document, and kept safely, she will know what happened to her family.”last_img read more

Monarch Academy Introduces College Culture to Baltimore Kids

first_imgMonarch Academy, a Baltimore charter school, has begun working with Morgan State University in order to introduce its students to higher education. With two programs, ASHE and College Explorers, Monarch provides its students with emotional and academic support while also exposing them to positive example of higher education.Students at Baltimore’s Monarch Academy work with mentors from Morgan State University. (Photo by Janneh G. Johnson)Yoeanna Ambrose, a teacher at Monarch Academy and the program coordinator, spoke to the AFRO about her relationship with the program. Monarch Academy is a series of charter schools in Baltimore and Washington, D.C. operated by TranZed Alliance, a Baltimore based non-profit focused on kids with special needs. The Morgan State University Office of Community Service coordinates the College Explorers and ASHE with Monarch Academy. Brittany Laws is Morgan’s program coordinator.“Morgan currently offers a program called College Explorers to our students which takes place four times a week. Morgan buses students to and from Monarch Academy and the students visit Morgan to get academic support and shadow a student. ASHE is for the students who can’t go to Morgan State for various reasons so that the mentors can be brought to them.”The College Explore program began earlier this year and the students who have been a part of it have experienced less behavioral and academic issues while also exposing students to the realities of college life and sparking an interest in higher education, according to Ambrose.The average ASHE day includes 2 hours where the students are tutored by their mentors in either math or reading and time for the students to discuss other things as well, such as personal problems or other academic subjects.“A lot of my kids learn lessons from their mentors that effect their performance, like one of my eighth-grade girls had a conversation with her mentor about the school to prison pipeline and how standardized testing plays a part in negative stereotypes and funding and she said that she wanted to put her best foot forward on the state exams so it wouldn’t be said that Baltimore students can’t read or aren’t intelligent due to a lack of effort.”Kai  Innam, a senior at Morgan State who has worked with the ASHE program plans to continue mentoring even after graduating.“I’ve been working with the program for about ten weeks and I’m so hopeful that this will impact the kids in a positive way because this is something I want to do past my graduation. I want to keep helping these kids because they’re amazing, they just need to have someone by their side showing them support. That one on one attention boosts their confidence and that helps their performance,” Innam told the AFRO.“It’s a give and take experience. I’ve learned patience and I’ve learned to be more understanding and I really have a new appreciation for teaching kids at the middle school level.”Myonna Simpkins, an eighth-grade student enrolled at Monarch Academy, plans to pursue her Doctoral degree, and become an OB-GYN and believes that this program will help her do so.“I’ve learned a lot about the positive parts of college and the do’s and don’ts. Our mentors aren’t that much older than us so I’ll be going through the same things they’re going through. I want to become the same things that they want to become,” Simpkins said.last_img read more

Physicists gadget lets you hear the sound of a perfect golf swing

first_img Citation: Physicist’s gadget lets you hear the sound of a perfect golf swing (2008, September 2) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-09-physicist-gadget-golf.html Golf is a game of intense concentration. Golfers receive advice on the precise stance, grip, wrist angle, shoulder angle, head angle, and other details to improve their swings. But a new golf gadget developed by a Yale physics professor takes a different approach to golf training. Rather than focusing on the mechanics, the device lets players literally “tune in” to the sound of their swings. The Physics of a golf swing Explore further Professor Bob Grober´s invention, called System-1, instantly converts the velocity of a golf swing into sound, allowing the player to hear their swing in progress. The device consists of two components. A long, thin electronics piece slides into the shaft of almost any club, which includes sensors and a microprocessor to measure the swing´s velocity. The data is then wirelessly transmitted to a receiver that can be tucked into a golfer´s pocket, which converts the data to sound and sends it to a headset. A golf swing can be programmed to sound like one of about 120 instruments, such as piano, piccolo, viola, or synthesized rock organ. The faster the club moves, the higher the pitch and volume. Grober hopes that the device will help people better understand the tempo, timing, and rhythm of their swings in an intuitive way.”Getting people to change mechanical things, which are habits, is a very difficult thing, it could take months or maybe years,” Grober said in a video at Courant.com. “But when you turn all of that into something that people can hear, people are very good at adjusting sound, people are very sensitive to sound. And you can get people to change habits, mechanical things that they do, on the timescale of 5, 10, 15 minutes. Once you let them hear what it sounds like and show them how easy it is to do, that changes things in a dramatic way.”Grober founded a company called Sonic Golf to market System-1. So far, he has sold seven of the devices at $1,000 each. Among his customers is Vijay Singh, a Masters and two-time PGA Championship winner, who bought one in June and uses it daily. Other customers include PGA Champion Rich Beem, tour veteran Fred Funk and CBS Sports commentator Peter Kostas.Grober plans to produce another 100 units by mid-September and batches of 1,000 by January. He also hopes to reduce the price to around $400, and will try to appeal to professionals as well as hobbyists. The device might also be useful for physical therapy applications.He says that there are lots of golf gadgets on the market that promise to improve your game. However, most of them don´t work. He also noted that other golf devices exist that use sound to improve technique, such as the popular David Leadbetter Swing Setter, but hopes that his invention will offer something new.But he says developing the technology was the easy part. Developing a successful business is more challenging. He has contracts with local suppliers in Connecticut to produce the shaft insert and the electronics, and he´s currently looking for a company to package the product.As Yale´s Frederick Phineas Rose Professor of Applied Physics, Grober studies excitons, biexcitons and electron-hole plasma in narrow quantum wells. He says that golf is just a hobby that got out of control. A former intercollegiate player at Vanderbilt, he now has a handicap between zero and two. Although he teaches an introductory course at Yale called “Physics of the Game of Golf,” most of Grober´s academic work is unrelated to the Sonic Golf technology.More information: www.sonicgolf.comvia: www.courant.com Physics Professor Bob Grober plans to produce 100 System-1 devices by mid-September and batches of 1,000 by January. He hopes to reduce the price to around $400, and will try to appeal to professionals as well as hobbyists. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more