Kahnawake Mohawk kayakers lighting sparks on the water

first_imgAPTN National NewsTraditionally, it’s an Inuit means of transport.Originally built to navigate the choppy waters of the Arctic, the kayak has since become popular all over the world.That includes the Mohawk community of Kahnawake.As APTN’s Tom Fennario reports, that’s where two young Mohawk women are quickly climbing the sport’s ranks in Quebec.last_img

Annan condemns kidnapping of South Korean businessman in Iraq

Asked about the incident, a UN spokesman said the Secretary-General was concerned at the recent trend in hostage-taking, including in Iraq, which, he said, does not bode well for the country’s peaceful transition.Through his spokesman, Mr. Annan repeated his condemnation of all acts of hostage-taking, which have no justification and can only undermine the restoration of peace and security in Iraq.

Two population experts win UN awards

The award is presented each year to individuals and institutions for outstanding work in population and in improving the health and welfare of individuals, according to the UN Population Fund (UNFPA).Ms. Concepcion is well known to international demographers and family planners, and her work has contributed significantly to population research and development policy in the Philippines, UNFPA says.The APROFAM ONG, founded in 1964, is a private, not-for-profit, non-denominational organization providing reproductive health education, care and counselling to Guatemalan families. Among other things, the organization helped Guatemala with some reproductive health initiatives, such as the 2001 social development and population law, which helped create the legislative and operational framework for population and reproductive health programmes in the country.Each winner will receive a certificate, a gold medal and an equal share of a monetary prize at a ceremony to be held in July at UN headquarters in New York. read more

While tasked with boosting ad revenue new Pandora CEO must also confront

by Ryan Nakashima, The Associated Press Posted Sep 12, 2013 3:55 pm MDT While tasked with boosting ad revenue, new Pandora CEO must also confront rising royalties AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email LOS ANGELES, Calif. – One of the biggest challenges facing Brian McAndrews, the new CEO of Pandora, will be renegotiating the royalty rates the Internet radio giant pays to the music industry.If Pandora doesn’t prevail, the outcome could impede the company’s growth and hamper its ability to compete with services such as Apple’s iTunes Radio, which launches next week.For each song Pandora streams to listeners it pays a fraction of a penny to recording labels. The companies begin negotiations before the federal Copyright Royalty Board in January and both sides are already digging their heels in.Just like past disputes, the haggling could drag on for years while the government plays referee. In the end, users might have to listen to more ads between songs or pay more in subscription fees to avoid them.McAndrews, 54, was appointed Pandora’s CEO on Wednesday. He told The Associated Press that the royalty fight is “a ways off” and that he’ll rely on the counsel of co-founder Tim Westergren and outgoing CEO Joe Kennedy.“I’m confident we’ll be prepared and do the right thing,” he said.“I do share Pandora’s longstanding belief that musicians should be fairly compensated for their work,” McAndrews said, adding that the existing patchwork of laws was “created piecemeal over decades” and “doesn’t serve any one very well.”Pandora allows users to listen to music on computers, smartphones or other Internet-connected devices. It’s free as long as listeners put up with a few ads. For each song Pandora streams, it pays the music industry a royalty fee, which in aggregate amounted to over $200 million last year. The royalty rate is set by the U.S. government.McAndrews is the former CEO of digital advertising company aQuantive, which was sold to Microsoft for $6.3 billion in 2007. Pandora hired McAndrews in an effort to boost the money it makes from advertising.While McAndrews said he’d focus on boosting ad revenue, music royalties are Pandora’s biggest hurdle to profitability. The fees are the main reason Pandora posted another net loss in the quarter through July, despite revenue rising 55 per cent.Overcoming these costs has proven difficult. In February, Pandora restricted listeners to 40 hours of free mobile listening per month, in an attempt to limit royalty expenses. But it reversed the move in August after listener hours began falling.Analysts have raised concerns about the bind Pandora is in, too.“They’re kind of stuck in this situation where they can’t get to profitability from growing their users. They need to get to profitability from giving their users less content,” said Rich Tullo, an analyst with financial services firm Albert Fried & Co. “That’s a kind of tough position to be in as a company.”What’s different about the upcoming fee negotiations is that Pandora’s survival is no longer in doubt.Since the company debuted on the stock market in the summer of 2011, Pandora has raised the cash to weather major setbacks. The company’s stock has jumped 135 per cent over the last year. Analysts expect that in the fiscal year through January, Pandora will post its first positive earnings per share since becoming a publicly traded company.Pandora’s revenue, which hit $427 million last year, is more than 20 times what it made in 2009, the last time it reached a deal with the recording industry.It now has 72.1 million monthly users, and some 2.5 million people have activated Pandora in their car dashboards. Apple Inc. will launch iTunes Radio in an operating system upgrade next Wednesday. The free service will then be available to hundreds of millions of iPhone and iPad users, and could cut into Pandora’s dominance.Some artists believe they haven’t been compensated enough for their contributions to Pandora’s success. Many of them want a bigger share of the riches music streaming is generating.David Lowery, frontman for the alternative rock band Cracker, blogged in June that he could make more from the sale of a single T-shirt than the $16.89 Pandora paid him for a million plays of the band’s 1993 hit “Low” in the final three months of last year.While he acknowledges he made $50,000 in royalties last year across all streaming and sales formats, Lowery told The Associated Press his fight is about the future, because services like Pandora are displacing other forms of listening.“If we don’t get the webcasting rights right for songwriters, we’re screwed,” Lowery said.Pandora argues that royalty rates are already too high and it has tried numerous tactics to drive them down. In June, it bought a South Dakota radio station to qualify for the lower fees charged to station owners. The company also backed a now-defunct bill in Congress that would have lowered its rates.Internet-powered music services are becoming more and more important to the industry. So-called “access models” made up 15 per cent of the music industry’s $7.1 billion in revenue last year, up from just 3 per cent in 2007, according to the Recording Industry Association of America.Because Pandora’s 2009 deal with record labels and publishers now acts as a benchmark for other companies, including Apple, any fee reductions in a new deal with Pandora would have a ripple effect across the industry.“That’s why everybody in the industry is very exercised about these rates,” says RIAA President Cary Sherman.Pandora pays record labels about $1,200 for every million song plays. The labels split the payments with performers. The rate goes up $100 each year through 2015, when the current deal expires.Pandora pays another $200 or so per million plays to session musicians, songwriters and publishers.In all, the payments amounted to more than $214 million last year, or roughly 50 per cent of Pandora’s fiscal 2013 revenue.Pandora has pointed out that, as a percentage of revenue, that’s more than the $300 million paid by Sirius XM, or about 9 per cent of revenue, and the $500 million paid by the entire traditional radio industry, or only 3 per cent.David Oxenford, a copyright attorney who has represented Pandora, says the Copyright Royalty Board’s likely first step when hearings start in January will be to give the music industry and Pandora six months to come to a deal on their own.Pandora is also fighting separate battles in court with the two major songwriters’ societies, Broadcast Music Inc. (BMI), and the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP), over songwriting royalties. It’s a separate challenge that McAndrews will also have to navigate.Still, even as they attack Pandora, music industry executives acknowledge that they share a future with the company.“We want Pandora to be a raging success,” said Paul Williams, president of ASCAP. “But their success should be our success, too.” read more

At General Debate Switzerland calls for UN reform to improve efficiency in

“We have to find solutions today for the challenges we will face tomorrow,” the Swiss President, Eveline Widmer-Schlumpf, told the 67th General Assembly at the start of this year’s General Debate. “In view of the growing interdependence between these challenges, we need the UN now more than ever. It must take its place at the heart of international governance.”The Swiss President is one of scores of heads of State and government and other high-level officials who are presenting their views and comment on issues of individual national and international relevance at the General Debate, which ends on 1 October.In her statement, she called for more intensive exchanges within the UN, as well as with actors from the worlds of academia, civil society and the private sector to promote creativity and foster broad support for UN activities.President Widmer-Schlumpf urged Security Council reform, warning that the UN is only capable of acting if it helps to find solutions to conflicts and does not block them.“The exercising of veto rights in the Security Council in cases of genocide, war crimes or crimes against humanity is difficult to justify,” she stressed, calling on Heads of State and Government at today’s session to support a Swiss-backed initiative to refer Syria to the Hague-based International Criminal Court, which tries those accused of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes.At a meeting in July, Council members were unable to reach agreement on a collective course of action for Syria, where over 18,000 people have been killed since an uprising against the regime of President Bashar Al-Assad erupted 18 months ago. According to UN estimates, some 2.5 million Syrians are in need of humanitarian aid.In his opening address to the General Debate earlier Tuesday, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said that brutal human rights abuses continue to be committed in Syria, mainly by Mr. Assad’s Government, but also by opposition groups.“There will be no security as long as human rights are being violated in the most serious manner, and as long as those responsible believe that they are safe from prosecution,” President Widmer-Schlumpf said.She added, “Switzerland therefore demands that those responsible for serious human rights violations be called to account. Impunity is not only immoral. It also hinders the post-conflict reconciliation process in society and encourages history to repeat itself.” read more

Free skating for Brock community on Family Day

Get your skates out — Brock employees are invited to enjoy the Family Day holiday on Monday Feb. 16 by taking advantage of a free Family Skate.Rink 1 at the Seymour-Hanna four-pad, on St. Paul Street West in St. Catharines, has been booked for an hour, starting at 2 pm.All Brock faculty and staff and their families are welcome to take part.

Enirgi Group completes construction and successful commissioning of separation plant at lithium

first_imgEnirgi Group Corp provides an update on the progress of the engineering and construction of its commercial scale demonstration lithium carbonate processing plant (the DXP Plant) at its flagship lithium project, the Salar del Rincón in Salta, Argentina and its on-time start-up of the first section of the plant (separation plant”) of the DXP Plant, which signals the end of major construction works and the beginning of commissioning.Enirgi Group owns 100% of the Enirgi lithium project through its wholly-owned subsidiary ADY Resources Ltd. The project’s DXP Plant is designed to produce battery grade lithium carbonate directly from raw, unconcentrated brine in 24 hours eliminating the reliance on capital intensive and environmentally invasive evaporation ponds. The DXP Plant will use Enirgi Group’s proprietary lithium extraction technology (DXP Technology), developed in-house by Enirgi Group’s Innovation Division in cooperation with the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO).Enirgi Group began construction of its DXP Plant on the Salar del Rincón in December 2016 to underpin the decision to build a 50,000 t/y commercial facility based on Enirgi Group’s proprietary DXP Technology. Previously, Enirgi Group retained SRK Consulting (US) to summarize the definitive feasibility study in the form of a technical report prepared in accordance with NI 43-101.Key DFS FindingsProbable Reserves          1.2 Mt lithium carbonate equivalent (LCE). (average lithium grade 371 mg/litre)Measured and Indicated Resources        3.5 Mt LCE (average lithium grade 393 mg/litre)Inferred Resources         4.8 Mt LCE (average lithium grade 406 mg/litre)Initial net capital expenditure   $720.1 million (including 8.62% contingency)Ungeared After-tax 9% NPV       $1.36 billionUngeared After-tax IRR                 30.80%Payback period                 4.13 years from start of commercial productionLife of Mine       24.5 yearsAverage annual production        50,000 t/y LCETotal cash operating cost             $2,070/t LCE for life of mineEnirgi Group’s Innovation Division is managing the construction and commissioning of the DXP Plant on site at Salar del Rincón. When fully commissioned, the DXP Plant will initially produce 1 t/d of battery grade lithium carbonate.The separation plant, which processes raw brine direct from the salar by removing impurities and preparing the brine for processing, is in operation after passing site acceptance testing. The separation plant will now operate under normal commercial production conditions to collect process data required for plant optimization and will be handed over to the operations team who have been closely involved in the engineering, design and construction of the DXP Plant Facility.Enirgi Group’s Innovation Division has practical start-up plans in place and the commissioning plan will ensure that each process is commissioned in sequence and working effectively, safely, and within specification in order to ensure a successful start-up. Wayne Richardson, President and CEO of Enirgi Group, said: “Our team has made solid progress in what is a compressed timeframe to deliver the start-up of the first section of the DXP Plant. We plan to bring additional sections on-line as we demonstrate the full lithium extraction capabilities of the technology and we are working towards sign-off from our technology partner, ANSTO, in mid-2017 completing validation of our DXP Technology in-situ and underpinning the value of our Lithium Project.”Enirgi Group’s Innovation Division expects to complete full commissioning of the DXP Plant by the end of May 2017.last_img read more

New Greek ambassador lands in Canberra

first_imgThe new Greek ambassador to Australia arrived in Canberra on Monday 11 January, to replace Haris Dafaranos, who left his position at the end of 2015. Prior to her appointment in Australia, Ekaterini Xagorari, 52, has served in Turkey and Cyprus. Accompanied by her husband and son, she was formally welcomed by the chief of protocol branch of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Lyndall Sachs. The new ambassador is expected to present her credentials to the governor general by the end of February. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

Albanians largest group to obtain Greek citizenship

first_imgAccording to data from the European Union’s statistics office Eurostat, the largest group of foreign nationals to obtain Greek citizenship in 2016 were Albanians.They came out on top with 88 per cent, a significant majority compared to the numbers that followed. Second were Ukrainians with 1.5 per cent, and Russians were not far behind with 1.2 per cent.That year, in total 33,210 foreigners were given Greek citizenship.Meanwhile European citizenship is proving to be quite popular, with the numbers on the rise. According to Eurostat, approximately 995,000 individuals obtained citizenship from an EU member state, up from 841,000 in 2015. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

Lego Reveals James Bond Aston Martin DB5

first_img The New Lego UCS Imperial Star Destroyer Is Nearly Four Feet LongLego Makes Building Sets Accessible to the Blind Twelve years ago, the Aston Martin DB5 that was used in Goldfinger went for a cool $2 million at auction. Thanks to Lego, you can now get your hands on one for a whole lot less money.For weeks now, Lego has been posting James Bond teasers on it social feeds. Today, they finally stopped pussyfooting around and broke the news: the Lego Creator Expert Series Aston Martin DB5 is here.Bond’s DB5 — which he drove in Goldfinger — is one of the most iconic cars from the films. It was packed full of cool gear from Q and his crew, from rotating, tire-slashing blades hidden in its wheels to machine guns to an ejector seat. If you’ve seen Goldfinger, you probably remember Q warning James to never ever touch the red button in the shift knob that activates it. The Lego version has been done up in 1/8 scale and it’s absolutely packed with detail.  1,290 pieces worth of detail, to be precise. Don’t expect to build this one in a hurry, brickhead Bond fans!The payoff will be worth it, though. Lego’s designers managed to do more than just capture the look of Bond’s DB5. There are working elements everywhere you turn. Rotate license plates to keep a low profile. Pop-out spinning wheel blades to fight off enemies that want to run you off the road. Stay on targetcenter_img Raise the rear-mounted bullet shield to protect yourself during the inevitable rolling gun battle. Flip up headlights to reveal the DB5’s machines guns when you need to deal with a particularly nettlesome foe.Need to get rid of an unwanted passenger who’s causing you grief? Ignore Q’s advice and hit that little red button. The Lego DB5 will eject just like the real thing did in the film.If you’re a Lego insider you can order the Creator Expert Series Aston Martin DB5 today. It retails for $149.99, and non-insiders can start placing orders on August 1. Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey.last_img read more

Motorcycle rider hurt attempting to pass between two vehicles

first_imgA Woodland motorcycle rider was hospitalized after trying to pass between two vehicles on his bike, causing a three-vehicle crash on Interstate 5 north of Woodland Sunday afternoon, according to the Washington State Patrol.The state patrol said Martin Jenkins, 54, was driving south on the highway about 4 miles north of Woodland when, around 3:30 p.m., he tried to pass between a car and an SUV.Starla J. Sawyer, 42, of Battle Ground, was driving in the left lane, and Renee L. Richards, 40, of Tacoma, was in the middle lane.According to the state patrol, Jenkins attempted to pass between the two vehicles, but struck both of them. That sent him out of control and off the road on the right side. He struck a guard rail then flew off the bike.Jenkins’ motorcycle kept going, re-entered the roadway then hit Sawyer’s car again before going off the highway and stopping in the median.Jenkins was taken to PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center for his injuries. Jenkins’ condition was not available. Sawyer and Richards were unhurt.The state patrol said improper passing caused the crash, and that Jenkins was cited for second-degree negligent driving.last_img read more

BRAC Hiatus Wont Extend Indefinitely

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR Washington, D.C. — With the Trump administration’s decision not to request additional base closures with this year’s budget submission, the Pentagon’s uphill battle to demonstrate the benefits of a new BRAC round to lawmakers has been placed on the back burner, but the discussion can be expected to return to Capitol Hill eventually. At some point, DOD will need to rebalance its infrastructure, Todd Harrison, director of defense budget analysis at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, told the audience Wednesday at the 2018 Defense Communities National Summit. “[That] will have to occur through a BRAC,” Harrison said.That time likely could come when lawmakers realize the rising defense budget is not translating into a significantly larger force structure. The need to curb spending as the nation’s debt grows could provide a strong push in that direction as well. “Then BRAC will come back up,” Harrison said.An additional factor at play is the dispute between the Pentagon and Congress over DOD’s estimate of its excess capacity. Lawmakers, along with a recent Government Accountability Office report, have called for a more precise estimate of the military’s unused capacity. In response, defense officials point out that is only possible when Congress authorizes a new BRAC round. Both sides have a point in this standoff, but lawmakers will be hesitant to jump into a new round in the absence of better data, said Mackenzie Eaglen, resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute.“It certainly helps forestall the next BRAC round,” Eaglen said.last_img read more

ProAL man sues Khaleda alleging meeting with ISI official

first_imgKhaleda ZiaThe head of a pro-Awami League organisation has lodged a complaint of sedition charge against BNP chairperson Khaleda Zia with a Dhaka court on Wednesday.Bangabandhu Foundation executive chairman Mashiur Rahman allegedly that Khaleda had held a secret meeting with an official of Pakistani intelligence agency ISI in the United Kingdom.The court of chief metropolitan magistrate Abdullah Al Masud that received the complant in the morning is set to pass an order later in the day.In his complaint, Mashiur claimed that during her stay in London, Khaleda met ISI official Junaid at Taj Hotel on 18 and 19 July last.He alleged that the meeting was held to instigate anarchy in the country, and deteriorate the Bangladesh-India relation and take it towards war.He came to know about the meeting through different media reports and investigation conducted by Bangabandhu Foundation’s London unit, Mashiur said.Mashiur filed another sedition case against the BNP chief on 25 January which is still under trial.last_img read more

Mandelas legacy cherished by some challenged by others

first_imgNelson Mandela. Photo: WikipediaA black and white photo of Nelson Mandela in boxing attire greets visitors to the gym where the liberation hero trained in the 1950s before delivering the knock-out blow to apartheid decades later.“He used to train here, I feel strong… Physically and mentally I get some strength,” said gym-goer Kgotso Phali, 18.The red and white walls of the gym, located in South Africa’s Soweto township, smell of fresh paint.The Donaldson Orlando Community Centre (DOCC) has been restored to its former glory to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Mandela’s birth.Mandela, South Africa’s first black president known locally by his clan name “Madiba”, died in 2013.“People had to carry passes-all these things are gone now. We are free,” thanks to him, said Andy Zameko, who said he was proud to work out in the same gym as Mandela.Mandela would visit the gym several times a week to train and forget the ordeal that was the fight against the white supremacist regime.“The walls of… the DOCC are drenched with sweet memories that will delight me for years,” Mandela wrote to his daughter Zindzi from his cell on Robben Island where he was imprisoned for 18 years.A copy of the letter, dated 9 December, 1979, is displayed on a wall in the gym.Nearby, young musicians seek to catch the attention of passing tourists in front of Mandela’s former home which has been transformed into a museum.“(He) makes us united. Now we are all united. (Blacks) can perform in theatres like the Joburg Theatre now-it was not the case before,” said guitarist Vincent Ncabashe, 49.‘Not living his dream’Others recognise the achievement but are disappointed in the post-apartheid reality.“Madiba is so inspiring for me,” said hip-hop singer Thobane Mkhize who sported a striking bouffant haircut.“But we are not living his dream,” said the 24-year-old musician.“The parliament is like a (sitcom), it is no longer a parliament because politicians are busy with corruption. Instead of being united, we are busy looking at the colours of the skin,” he added.“There was need for a figure to reconcile black and whites,” said Genevieve Assamoi, a 45-year-old from Ivory Coast.“He was crucial in ensuring that blacks did not take revenge on whites and to allow the whites to feel safe.”“Without him, we would still be stuck in the same place,” said policeman and father-of-three Mpho Ngobeni.‘He did his best’At a nearby petrol station in Soweto, two white men in khaki outfits completed the purchase of a car from two young black men-an unusual scene in the sprawling black-majority township.“The white people also got a chance (to stay in South Africa),” said Kaelen Viljoen as he struggled to hide the handgun clipped to his belt.The 22-year-old had also brought along a baseball bat, perched on the front seat of his 4X4.“I always have a weapon with me and I would not have left it at home when I came here,” said Viljoen, visiting Soweto for the first time in his life.“We called a lot of guys and we were very worried to come here, because he said there are a lot of black people here, and white people driving around here, is going to be a big problem.“(But) after we met the guys we bought the car from, we actually love it, they are very friendly.”Maxwell Huis, 44, a homeless father-of-two said the reality delivered by Mandela was starkly different to that which he had promised.“He sold the black people to the whites. There should have been a civil war-it would have changed things,” he added as he foraged for wood to burn.Mtate Phakela, 19, sees Mandela’s legacy very differently.“He gave us a revolution without a war. He gave us the idea of freedom through peace,” said the teenager.“But we are not economically free.”Economic divisions still plague the country with the median monthly salary for whites at around 10,000 rands ($753, 638 euros) but just 2,800 for the black community.“He did his best,” continued Mtate. “The people who came after could have done better to free us economically.”last_img read more

Nick Wright LeBron will surpass MJ if he wins another title this

first_imgCan LeBron surpass MJ?LeBron James was just named the 2016 AP Male Athlete of the Year, and today the guys were asked if LBJ has a chance to overtake MJ as the greatest basketball player ever. Nick doesn’t think it’s a question of if, just a matter of when. At 31, it’s his opinion that if LeBron wins his second of back-to-back titles in Cleveland this year, that should end the discussion. The rest of his career will just be padding stats.Cris disagrees. He remembers watching Jordan games, on TV and in person, and thinks people are too quick too forget his greatness. He believes, at this point, based on championship rings, Kobe is still ahead of LeBron, too. CC didn’t rule out the possibility LeBron will pass MJ, but he thinks James needs to get even with Jordan before people can start saying he’s surpassed him.Should the Cowboys sit Romo in Week 17?The Cowboys, or, more accurately, Jerry Jones, have decided that third-string quarterback Mark Sanchez a/k/a “The Sanchize” will take snaps over Tony Romo in the Cowboys’ season finale. Cris thinks it’s the right move to sit Romo in favor of Sanchez because there’s no upside to playing Romo. There’s only a downside if he gets injured. If Romo takes snaps with the backups, including a backup o-line, he’ll only face a greater injury risk. If he gets hurt, it will only hurt his trade value and he won’t be around if they need him in the playoffs.Nick disagrees with CC, and believes Week 17 is a golden opportunity to get Romo reps. If Prescott goes down and they need Romo in the playoffs, he won’t have to come off the bench cold, having seen no live action since August.Better offseason addition, Garoppolo or Tony Romo?The two top quarterback targets in the upcoming NFL offseason will be Jimmy Garoppolo and Tony Romo. The Patriots have already made it known around the league that it will take a 1st and a 4th rounder to land Jimmy G. The Cowboys moving Romo would be more complicated due to salary cap complications, but he’ll likely fetch at least a first round pick as well.Cris would make a move for Jimmy G, but he would kick the tires before doing the deal with Belichick, because it’s always fishy when he’s willing to move on from a player who is still a valuable asset. CC thinks that Garoppolo’s youth, combined with his athleticism and his training in Belichick’s system, makes him the best choice to be the future face of a franchise.Nick also thinks it makes more sense to trade for Garoppolo, but Belichick’s record of fleecing opposing teams in trades would make him think twice about doing deals with New England. He also sees Romo as a potentially better fit for a handful of “win now” teams like the Broncos and Texans. The biggest question mark with Romo is obviously his health and durability, which will leave fans of whichever team he plays for with their hearts firmly planted in their throats for the entire season.Guests:Eric Mangini – Former NFL head coach for the Jets and Browns is in-studio to give his take on Mark Sanchez getting reps in Week 17 over Tony Romo, why he thinks Romo will still be in Dallas next year, which team he thinks can beat New England in the playoffs, and his pick for NFL coach of the year.Peter Schrager – Fox NFL Insider joins the show to discuss the league buzz after Week 16, which teams he think could be a landing spot for Jimmy Garoppolo, potential head coaching candidates in Buffalo, why Matt Ryan is his MVP, and why Atlanta will be a dangerous team in the playoffs.Miesha Tate – Former UFC star joins the show to look ahead to Ronda Rousey’s return against Amanda Nunes in UFC 207, what obstacles she thinks Rousey faces after a prolonged layoff, why she thinks that Rousey has lost the edge she had before her Holly Holm knockout, and her fight prediction.last_img read more

New El Meco Underwater Museum for Cancun

first_imgCancun, Q.R. — The development of a new underwater museum is underway in Cancun waters with the creation of arrecife Maya.The announcement for the new project was made in February when, at a press conference, Ferrat Mancera said it will be a new attraction for the tourist destination.Iván Ferrat Mancera, president of the Nautical Associates of Cancun, explained that the environmental aspect of the project is being led by oceanologist Pablo Pantoja. He said that with the advice of biologists, they are in the process of making non-extractive use in the area of Meco, an area that we already operate and taking care for 3 years.Once complete, the underwater museum will consist of three different areas, one will be a Mayan city with different types of ruins that are small replicas that were approved by the National Institute of Anthropology and History.Another project is an area of many sculptures, of about 90 molds of angels and spectacular cultures. The third is from a company in Monterrey that makes sculptures inside and outside of the water, so we have proposed a submarine snake.He says that the project “meets the requirements set by the authorities regarding the type of material.”The new project is called El Meco Underwater Museum and is separate from the current MUSA underwater museum between Cancun and Isla Mujeres.He says that initially there had been talks that it would be an extension of the Underwater Museum of Cancun (Musa) but there were specific differences with that company so they decided to carry out a similar separate project.The museum of arrecife Maya (Mayan reef) is in an area 200 meters wide by 800 meters long with a depth of four meters, which will make it more attractive for snorkelers.“This part will be a snorkel and shallow, only 3 or 4 meters deep so the snorkeler will be able to interact with the sculptures and be very close. You will be able to take pictures,” he said.In the same way, he commented that these sculptures will be designed so that they can generate algae so fish can use them as a refuge.Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Automotive Dashboard Camera Market Size Historical Growth Analysis Opportunities and Forecast

first_imgMarket Study Report provides ‘Global Automotive Dashboard Camera, 2019 Market Research Report’, which is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the Automotive Dashboard Camera market.Automotive dashboard cameras are always switched on in the driving mode and sometimes even in parking mode to record any unauthorized break-in or movement in parked vehicles. In the context of China-US trade war and global economic volatility and uncertainty, it will have a big influence on this market. Automotive Dashboard Camera Report by Material, and Geography – Global Forecast to 2023 is a professional and comprehensive research report on the world’s major regional market conditions, focusing on the main regions (North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific) and the main countries (United States, Germany, United Kingdom, Japan, South Korea and China).Get Sample Copy of this Report @ https://www.bigmarketresearch.com/request-sample/3199838?utm_source=HTN&utm_medium=SSIn this report, the global Automotive Dashboard Camera market is valued at USD XX million in 2019 and is projected to reach USD XX million by the end of 2023, growing at a CAGR of XX% during the period 2019 to 2023.The report firstly introduced the Automotive Dashboard Camera basics: definitions, classifications, applications and market overview; product specifications; manufacturing processes; cost structures, raw materials and so on. Then it analyzed the world’s main region market conditions, including the product price, profit, capacity, production, supply, demand and market growth rate and forecast etc. In the end, the report introduced new project SWOT analysis, investment feasibility analysis, and investment return analysis.The major players profiled in this report include:• Garmin• HP• LG Innotek• Panasonic• PittasoftThe end users/applications and product categories analysis:On the basis of product, this report displays the sales volume, revenue (Million USD), product price, market share and growth rate of each type, primarily split into-• General TypeOn the basis on the end users/applications, this report focuses on the status and outlook for major applications/end users, sales volume, market share and growth rate of Automotive Dashboard Camera for each application, including-• Passenger Cars• Commercial VehiclesGet a discount on this research report @ https://www.bigmarketresearch.com/request-for-discount/3199838?utm_source=HTN&utm_medium=SSAbout Us:Big Market Research has a range of research reports from various publishers across the world. Our database of reports of various market categories and sub-categories would help to find the exact report you may be looking for.Contact Us:Mr. Abhishek PaliwalBig Market Research5933 NE Win Sivers Drive, #205, Portland,OR 97220 United StatesDirect: +1-971-202-1575Toll Free: +1-800-910-6452E-mail help@bigmarketresearch.comlast_img read more

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first_img News | Ultrasound Imaging | July 31, 2019 Studies Confirm Clinical Value of ShearWave Elastography for Liver Fibrosis Evaluation SuperSonic Imagine announced the publication of the results of its prospective multicentric clinical study conducted in… read more News | Pediatric Imaging | August 14, 2019 Ultrasound Guidance Improves First-attempt Success in IV Access in Children August 14, 2019 – Children’s veins read more 360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 08, 2019 360 Degree View of an Echocardiography Exam on the SC2000 System This is a 360 degree view of a live cardiac echo demonstration for the Siemens Healthineers Acuson SC2000… read more The ScanTrainer transvaginal simulator is one example of Intelligent Ultrasound’s simulation technologies. News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 05, 2019 Digital Health Devices Used at Point of Care May Improve Diagnostic Certainty A West Virginia-based rural medical outreach event showcased the use of point-of-care technology in an ambulatory… read more News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 07, 2019 Contrast Use in First Transthoracic Echocardiogram for Heart Failure Reduces Repeat Testing Heart failure is the fourth most common cause for all admission to U.S. hospitals, and it is the most common reason for… read more 360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 09, 2019 360 Degree View of a Mitral Valve Ultrasound Exam on a Vivid E95 System A view of a mitral valve on a GE Healthcare Vivid E95 … read more News | Ultrasound Imaging | July 26, 2019 Intelligent Ultrasound Group Collaborating With the National Imaging Academy Wales Artificial intelligence (AI)-based ultrasound software and simulation company Intelligent Ultrasound Group plc (AIM:… read more News | December 09, 2011 ASE, SCA Release New Guideline for Ultrasound-Guided Vascular Cannulation Technology | Interventional Radiology | August 16, 2019 Profound Medical Receives U.S. FDA 510(k) Clearance for Tulsa-Pro Profound Medical Corp. announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to… read more December 9, 2011 — The American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) and the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists (SCA) have released a new performance guideline for heightening the use of ultrasound in guided vascular cannulation. The process involves the insertion of a catheter, or tube, into a major vein or artery. The guideline also contains recommendations on training for these life-saving procedures.The document recognizes and promotes the use of ultrasound technology to place catheters into major veins and arteries through visualization of these vessels beneath the skin. The guidelines follow the recommendations of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) in their 2001 report: Making Health Care Safer: A Critical Analysis of Patient Safety Practices. The report recommended the use of ultrasound for the placement of all catheters in major veins as one of 11 recommended practices aimed at improving patient care.“These guidelines promote patient safety by recommending ultrasound guidance as the preferred method for vascular access that is necessary for the administration of certain medications or monitoring heart function. This is especially true for catheters placed in the neck of adult patients and in the neck and groin of infants and children,” explained Kathryn Glas, M.D., FASE, MBA, associate professor of anesthesiology at the Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Ga. Glas is also a member of the ASE writing group and former chair of ASE’s Council on Intraoperative Echocardiography.Comprehensive practice guidelines and recommendations are made on the use of ultrasound to place catheters into the internal jugular veins; these veins carry deoxygenated blood from the head to the heart, subclavian veins in the upper chest, and femoral veins in the thigh. The guidelines work on the basis of the strength of the scientific evidence currently present in the literature.The role of ultrasound for placing large catheters into infants and children is discussed specifically, along with the use of ultrasound for placing catheters into arteries and peripheral veins. Recommendations are made for training clinicians on incorporation of ultrasound into their practice, including the role of simulation.Christopher Troianos, M.D., professor and chair of anesthesiology at The Western Pennsylvania Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pa., was the lead author on the document; it is titled “Guidelines for Performing Ultrasound Guided Vascular Cannulation: Recommendations of the American Society of Echocardiography and the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists.”“Millions of central venous catheters are inserted annually in the U.S. alone. Although there are inherent risks associated with central venous cannulation, for many years I have seen first-hand the benefits of using ultrasound in improving success and reducing complications. I am thankful that the ASE and SCA have supported the creation of this important document that will inform and educate many clinicians towards improving patient safety,” Troianos explained.ASE was represented in the writing group by members of its councils on intraoperative echocardiography and vascular ultrasound. The guideline will appear in the December 2011 issue of The Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography (JASE), and the SCA’s journal, Anesthesia & Analgesia (A&A). It is also available on the society’s website.For more information: www.asecho.org FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 read more 360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 11, 2019 360 Degree View of a Smartphone Performing a Cardiac Ultrasound Exam This 360 degree photo shows a basic, point-of-care cardiac echocardiogram being performed using a smartphone turned i read more Related Content News | Ultrasound Women’s Health | July 11, 2019 FDA Clears Koios DS Breast 2.0 AI-based Software Koios Medical announced its second 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).last_img read more

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first_img News | Ultrasound Women’s Health | July 11, 2019 FDA Clears Koios DS Breast 2.0 AI-based Software Koios Medical announced its second 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 07, 2019 Contrast Use in First Transthoracic Echocardiogram for Heart Failure Reduces Repeat Testing Heart failure is the fourth most common cause for all admission to U.S. hospitals, and it is the most common reason for… read more 360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 09, 2019 360 Degree View of a Mitral Valve Ultrasound Exam on a Vivid E95 System A view of a mitral valve on a GE Healthcare Vivid E95 … read more News | Ultrasound Imaging | July 31, 2019 Studies Confirm Clinical Value of ShearWave Elastography for Liver Fibrosis Evaluation SuperSonic Imagine announced the publication of the results of its prospective multicentric clinical study conducted in… read more Technology | Interventional Radiology | August 16, 2019 Profound Medical Receives U.S. FDA 510(k) Clearance for Tulsa-Pro Profound Medical Corp. announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to… read more July 17 2014 — The Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography (JASE) announced the publication of a new consensus statement on the use of focused cardiac ultrasound (FoCUS) in its July 2014 issue. The article, entitled “International Evidence-Based Recommendations for Focused Cardiac Ultrasound,” was spearheaded by the World Interactive Network Focused on Critical UltraSound (WINFOCUS), and presents the results of the first International Conference on FoCUS, which aimed to comprehensively address this branch of point-of-care ultrasound, providing a framework for FoCUS to standardize its application in different clinical settings around the world.The practice of cardiac ultrasound, also known as echocardiography, has changed dramatically since its introduction in 1954. The accuracy, efficiency and safety of cardiac ultrasound have made it the diagnostic choice for many clinicians when evaluating patients who present with signs or symptoms of cardiovascular disease. The recent improvements in portability of cardiovascular ultrasound equipment are now also having a significant impact on the expansion of its use in medical practice.The lead author of the paper, Gabriele Via, M.D., noted, “These recommendations represent a turning point for the medical community, especially, but not exclusively, in the field of emergency and critical care. For the first time, under the auspices of WINFOCUS, multiple authoritative scientific societies representing different specialties and continents (including the world’s major echocardiographic societies) collaborated to set the standards for the practice of and the education to focused cardiac ultrasound (FoCUS).” Via is an intensivist and anesthesiologist at the Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, in Pavia, Italy, as well as director of the WINFOCUS Critical Care Echocardiography Training Program and of the WINFOCUS Basic Echo (WBE) curriculum.In his recent inaugural address in Portland, Ore., the new president of the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE), Neil Weissman, M.D., FASE, spoke about the growth of cardiovascular ultrasound, especially among non-cardiologists, and his vision for ASE and the medical field to embrace these new users to improve patient care in a growing number of clinical settings. In his first President’s Message in this same issue of JASE, Weissman noted, “The future of ultrasound will also be a more focused, basic exam to address one particular aspect of health or simply as an extension of the physical exam. Cardiovascular ultrasound will likely have a broader role in healthcare and be used by more healthcare workers.”The publication of this document in JASE represents the first of collaborations between WINFOCUS and ASE, and will make the paper available to a wide audience worldwide.Via added, “As envisioned by WINFOCUS a decade ago, FoCUS will now be increasingly taught and practiced as a first-line diagnostic test in a wide range of medical scenarios: from cardiac arrest, to shock, heart failure, trauma, sepsis and respiratory failure. And, potentially, everywhere a patient is: from pre-hospital care and scarce resource settings to the most complex intra-hospital contexts.”For more information: www.onlinejase.com FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 05, 2019 Digital Health Devices Used at Point of Care May Improve Diagnostic Certainty A West Virginia-based rural medical outreach event showcased the use of point-of-care technology in an ambulatory… read more 360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 11, 2019 360 Degree View of a Smartphone Performing a Cardiac Ultrasound Exam This 360 degree photo shows a basic, point-of-care cardiac echocardiogram being performed using a smartphone turned i read more News | Pediatric Imaging | August 14, 2019 Ultrasound Guidance Improves First-attempt Success in IV Access in Children August 14, 2019 – Children’s veins read more read more The ScanTrainer transvaginal simulator is one example of Intelligent Ultrasound’s simulation technologies. News | Ultrasound Imaging | July 26, 2019 Intelligent Ultrasound Group Collaborating With the National Imaging Academy Wales Artificial intelligence (AI)-based ultrasound software and simulation company Intelligent Ultrasound Group plc (AIM:… read more Related Content Feature | July 17, 2014 International Group Issues Recommendations for Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Use 360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 08, 2019 360 Degree View of an Echocardiography Exam on the SC2000 System This is a 360 degree view of a live cardiac echo demonstration for the Siemens Healthineers Acuson SC2000… read morelast_img read more

Why Workflow Engines Must Work Right

first_imgSiemens Go.Top CT scanner at SCCT19Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 15.14%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) read more FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Physicians work differently. What they do and how they do it depends on their specialty. Radiologists and cardiologists, general practitioners and orthopedists — like brothers, sisters and cousins; dads, moms and grandparents — all are in the same family.People routinely take pictures that show things in different ways. Yet they can all be posted on Instagram and Facebook and sent by e-mail, cell phone, even Twitter. Now enterprise imaging wants to do for physicians what social media has done for the public.Not surprisingly, there are challenges. One of them is really big. It has to do with the different ways that physicians work.People in different walks of life can post pictures easily, because regardless of what they photograph, their pictures are all taken the same way. Radiologists take a multitude of pictures — magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), to name a few — but the work that underlies taking these pictures is always the same. This led years ago to DICOM, which is as close to being a hero as a communications standard can get.DICOM saved radiology from information overload and markedly increased productivity. In the process, it made possible the most successful healthcare IT networks ever developed, ones that — quite frankly — proved that medical records could be digitalized.Re-engineering PACSNow it’s time for the next phase — the ingestion and management of many types of medical images. Given the extraordinary success of picture archiving and communication systems (PACS), and human propensity for making the future from the past, it will be tempting to make enterprise imaging in the likeness of PACS, retrofitting its components and reorienting them to accommodate new management, workflow and visualization in nonproprietary ways (i.e., vendor neutral). That idea has merit, so long as the abilities of individual physicians are not impaired.Critically important is developing workflow engines that allow individual physicians to do what they do best. Ideally an enterprise imaging network would rely on a single workflow engine, one that harmonizes how different physicians care for their patients; allows the identification and exchange of different types of images; weaves these images into the fabric of data storage; and supports their management by vendor neutral archives (VNA) and integrated imaging platforms. The trick will be doing so without causing any significant adverse effects.I know from personal experience that bad things can come from good intentions.In the late 1950s, the St. Lawrence Seaway opened, clearing the way for ocean-going ships to travel from the Atlantic through the Great Lakes. The Seaway opened the door not only to commerce but sea lampreys, which devastated the trout population of the Great Lakes. These revolting creatures, called “vampires of the sea” because they latch onto and suck the lifeblood from their prey, caused an explosion in the population of alewives, which had been held in check by the trout.Of Lampreys and AlewivesSpeaking as someone who, as a child, pulled a lamprey from his leg in waist deep water, the alewives were worse. These saltwater fish, which followed the same path as the lampreys, peaked in the sweltering summers of the mid-1960s, died in droves, washed ashore — and rotted. Bulldozers pushed their carcasses into piles and dump trucks took them somewhere out of town to be buried. But the stench was inescapable.Life didn’t return to normal in my hometown until ecologists found a way to destroy the lamprey larvae and introduced coho salmon to eat the alewives. Today the lampreys are in check and ports along the Lake Michigan shore host coho fishing derbies.Just as the locks of the Great Lakes produced an economic boom for the Midwest, developing workflow engines that harmonize the various practices of medicine could improve and reduce the cost of patient care. Mistakes in healthcare flow through knowledge gaps that can only be plugged with teamwork. Better communications and increased collaboration are the stuff from which these plugs are made. But before putting in place the needed workflow engines, it makes sense to examine whether or how these engines might negatively affect the way physicians work.Enterprise imaging needs an environment stocked with tools that allow free-thinking experts from different specialties to develop a consensus on how best to manage the patient. The challenge is to create a common image management structure that accommodates the diversity of medical practice and supports best-of-breed tools.Like the locks and canals that connect the Great Lakes, workflow engines could inadvertently do harm, if they take away the uniqueness that make specialized physicians special.It would be nice to see medicine go straight to the derbies — and skip the lamprey and alewife phases.Editor’s note: This is the third blog in a four-part series on enterprise imaging. The first blog, “The Impracticality of a Truly Universal Viewer for Enterprise Imaging,” can be found here. The second blog, “Will Enterprise Imaging Save Hippocratic Medicine?” can be found here. News | Neuro Imaging | August 16, 2019 ADHD Medication May Affect Brain Development in Children A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect development of the brain’s… read more Technology | Interventional Radiology | August 16, 2019 Profound Medical Receives U.S. FDA 510(k) Clearance for Tulsa-Pro Profound Medical Corp. announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to… read more Technology | Neuro Imaging | August 07, 2019 Synaptive Medical Launches Modus Plan With Automated Tractography Segmentation Synaptive Medical announced the U.S. launch and availability of Modus Plan featuring BrightMatter AutoSeg. This release… read more Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the… read more Video Player is loading.GE Cardiographe cardiac CT scanner at SCCT19Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:38Loaded: 26.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:38 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Greg Freiherr, Industry Consultant Greg Freiherr has reported on developments in radiology since 1983. He runs the consulting service, The Freiherr Group. Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more center_img News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more Sea Lamprey photo courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. Blog | Greg Freiherr, Industry Consultant | Enterprise Imaging| May 18, 2016 Why Workflow Engines Must Work Right News | Artificial Intelligence | August 08, 2019 Half of Hospital Decision Makers Plan to Invest in AI by 2021 August 8, 2019 — A recent study conducted by Olive AI explores how hospital leaders are responding to the imperative read more News | PACS | August 08, 2019 NetDirector Launches Cloud-based PDF to DICOM Conversion Service NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange and integration platform, has diversified their radiology automation options… read more Related Content Images of regions of interest (colored lines) in the white matter skeleton representation. Data from left and right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) were averaged. Image courtesy of C. Bouziane et al. Technology | Cybersecurity | August 07, 2019 ScImage Introduces PICOM ModalityGuard for Cybersecurity ScImage Inc. is bridging the gap between security and functionality with the introduction of the PICOM ModalityGuard…. read morelast_img read more