Georgia State University becomes 34th member of the National Association of Collegiate eSports

first_img“We’re excited to welcome Georgia State University to NACE,” said Michael Brooks, NACE Executive Director. “Georgia State represents our second institution in as many weeks to join out of the state of Georgia. I’m certain their leadership in esports will serve as the model of varsity esports in the southeast for decades to come.”“We are honoured that Georgia State has become one of the Georgia Esports League’s inaugural members,” said Andrew Greenberg, President of the Georgia Game Developers Association, the organisation sponsoring GEL. “This gives its students the chance to earn both scholarships and internships, as well as compete with varsity college teams around the state. Georgia State clearly recognises its students’ interest in esports. We have no doubt this means even more smart, talented students applying to the university.”Esports Insider says: More activity in the university space. Brawlhalla and Paladins are interesting games to start with, so it’ll be interesting to see if the “GEL” branches out. Georgia State University has become the 34th member of the National Association of Collegiate eSports (“NACE”) with new programs for those interested in esports. The announcement states that the University has joined NACE and will also start the Georgia Esports League (“GEL”) in September. Students from Georgia State will battle it out in Hi-Rez studio’s Paladins and Brawlhalla against students from Georgia Institute of Technology, Kennesaw State University, the University of Georgia and others.  Furthermore, Georgia State will provide practice suits, a venue for tournament play and a small number of scholarships for those qualifying to compete in NACE tournaments. Additionally, the Georgia Esports League will provide scholarships to those winning statewide events.  Having joined NACE, Georgia State University will be eligible to compete in the national league from early September. The university will also enable students to learn about the broadcasting, production and marketing of esports and tournaments as well as coaching, student management and game development.  “The skills developed by esports-interested students are the very skills most needed for success in the 21st century economy, including collaborative soft skills and computer coding,” said David Cheshier, Director of the Georgia State Creative Media Industries Institute. “We see this initiative as building essential links to emerging creative careers in animation, 3D and immersive world creation, and other media industries.”last_img

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *