Sex buyers are rich, educated and not single – survey claims

first_imgWhatsApp Email Advertisement Previous articleWeekend Munster Rugby FixturesNext articleLIT and Mary I into Fitzgibbon quarter-finals admin NewsLocal NewsSex buyers are rich, educated and not single – survey claimsBy admin – February 12, 2013 566 Linkedincenter_img Print Twitter ONE in four people surveyed who have paid for sex, said they encountered trafficked or controlled women in Ireland. Some said they refused to continue with the transaction as the believed the women were “too young, unhappy, unwilling or intimidated”. Furthermore, the survey carried out by the Immigrant Council of Ireland, says that the majority of men are middle to high earners in society, have third level education and are in long-term relationships if not married. Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Being named in the local newspaper if prosecuted for sexual offences ranked as one of the highest rated deterrents to men buying sex. That, and obtaining a criminal record are only surpassed by the fear of contracting a sexually transmitted disease.Denise Charlton, Chief Executive of the Immigrant Council of Ireland said: “These findings are an important contribution to the current debate on whether to curb exploitation, abuse and trafficking by targeting the buyers of sex. We have now heard from the buyers themselves that such laws would be a deterrent.”The profile of those who use prostitutes has shown they are most likely to be middle aged men (36% aged 25 and 44, with 48% aged over 45) who have completed third level education (41%) and are earning more than €20,000 (70%) with just over a fifth topping the €40,000 wage bracket (21%). In addition just over half said they were in a relationship.“The majority of buyers had paid for sex when abroad, mostly in Britain, Germany, the Netherlands and Thailand showing that buyers are attracted to destinations where prostitution has been legalised or is tolerated.”The online survey is part of a Europe wide project, ‘Stop Traffick!’ supported by the EU, and which over a three-month period used social media, websites and chatrooms to invite responses from both Irish sex buyers and those who do not use prostitutes.“We know too that the image of the happy independent hooker which is being portrayed by those opposed to new laws is not the reality. 24% of buyers reconsidered a transaction because they believed the women and girls involved were controlled, unhappy, too young, unwilling or intimidated.“The fact that buyers generally have a higher income, are better educated and in a relationship dispels the myth of prostitution being used by people who are lonely, isolated or insecure.”The survey results will be shared with the Oireachtas Justice Committee as they continue their consultation process into legislation for prostitution.“We hope it will form part of their deliberations as they continue the review of the laws on prostitution”, concluded Ms Charlton.IN NUMBERS411 survey responses,57 men were buyers of sex1 woman admitted paying for sex24% reconsidered the transaction32% feared disease19% feared a criminal conviction17% feared jail time17% feared being named in local newspaper. Facebooklast_img read more

News story: Damian Hinds: Learning life-saving skills in school is crucial

first_imgSchools will be encouraged and supported to teach high-quality relationships education, RSE and health education – tailored to meet their pupils’ needs – from September 2019, ahead of it becoming compulsory in September 2020. The Department for Education’s plans to introduce CPR on to the curriculum is a decisive moment in the battle to improve cardiac arrest survival rates, following years of campaigning by the BHF and others. There are 30,000 out of hospital cardiac arrests every year, and each day people needlessly die because bystanders don’t have the confidence or knowledge to perform CPR and defibrillation. This is why all schoolchildren should be given the opportunity to learn these skills. Introducing CPR lessons into health education in all state-funded secondary schools is a significant step that promises to improve the odds of survival for countless people who have a cardiac arrest in the future. For every minute without life-saving treatment the chance of surviving a cardiac arrest drops by about 10% – meaning that the time before an ambulance arrives is crucial – but the British Red Cross has found that 95% of adults wouldn’t be able, confident or willing to help in 3 examples of life-threatening first aid emergencies.To ensure the next generation knows what to do in an emergency, the government is planning to make health education compulsory in all state-funded schools. Under the proposed new guidance, by the end of secondary school pupils will be taught how to administer CPR, the purpose of defibrillators, and basic treatments for common injuries.The proposals are part of the Department for Education’s plans to strengthen teaching of health, sex and relationships education – building on free resources already available for schools to teach first aid including those provided by the Every Child a Lifesaver Coalition, made up of the British Heart Foundation, St John Ambulance and the British Red Cross.Simon Gillespie, Chief Executive of the British Heart Foundation, said: Professor Huon Gray, National Clinical Director for Heart Disease at NHS England, said: We are delighted that schoolchildren will have the opportunity of learning life-saving and first aid skills. Knowing how to react when someone suffers a cardiac arrest will truly save lives. Increasing the number of people trained in resuscitation complements the long-term plan for the NHS which will set out a strategy for the prevention and treatment of heart attack and stroke. The Education Secretary today (3 January 2019) underlined the importance of every child having the chance to learn life-saving skills such as CPR and how to get help in a medical emergency, under plans for health education to be taught in every school.With emergency services reporting a spike in cardiac arrests during the winter months, and survival rates lower than usual – according to NHS England figures – Damian Hinds stressed the importance of the government’s plans for all children to be taught basic first aid in schools under proposals due to be rolled out from 2020.The British Heart Foundation hailed the plans as a “decisive moment” in improving on the fact that fewer than 1 in 10 people who have a cardiac arrest outside hospital in the UK survive. In countries that already teach CPR in schools, cardiac arrest survival rates are more than double those of the UK.Education Secretary Damian Hinds said: On arriving at university I was struck that the American students I met knew how to do CPR – and I didn’t have a clue. As a father I want my children to have the knowledge and skills they need to keep themselves safe and help others, and as Education Secretary I want that for every child. Learning the basic skills of first aid and techniques like CPR will give young people the confidence to know that they can step in to help someone else in need and in the most extreme cases – it could potentially save a life. That’s why we took the decision to include health education alongside relationship education for primary school children and relationship and sex education for secondary children. These subjects are a crucial part of our work to ensure children learn the wider skills they need to flourish in the modern world.last_img read more