Staff at Ivan’s stage sit-in for payment

first_imgNewsLocal NewsStaff at Ivan’s stage sit-in for paymentBy Alan Jacques – January 23, 2014 773 #HearThis: New music and video from Limerick rapper Strange Boy Celebrating a ground breaking year in music from Limerick Emma Langford shortlisted for RTE Folk Award and playing a LIVE SHOW!!! this Saturday Linkedin Email Previous articleLimerick schools accused of unfair admission policyNext articleAviation course takes off at LIT Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Twitter Facebook City protests over sealing of Mother and Baby home records center_img Print RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp STAFF at one of Limerick’s best known convenience stores staged a sit-in protest this Wednesday after they were left without pay following the closure of the business earlier in the week.Thirty workers are demonstrating at Ivan’s on the Ennis Road in Caherdavin to secure money owed to them, including holiday and redundancy pay.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Staff members told the Limerick Post that pay cheques issued last week had bounced and that their protest would continue until they receive their full entitlements including wages, P45s and a letter from their former employer to process social welfare payments.Mary Sheehan who has worked at Ivan’s for the past nine years said the latest development was a “big blow” for all staff members.“We got a text on Sunday afternoon to be at the store at 8 pm for a meeting. We then got five minutes notice that the store was closing. This is just not acceptable,” said the 61-year-old who worked on the Deli counter.“The management knew they were closing weeks ago and they should have told us long before now. They allowed us take orders for cakes at the weekend knowing we were going to be closed. I feel terrible for all the customers who ordered cakes,” the Kileely woman remarked.“I have worked since I was 12-years-old and I had to go to the dole office this week for the first time in my life. I didn’t know where to go and didn’t have the proper forms or anything. I was in tears before I got to the counter.“We will not be moved from here until we get our wages and everything else we are owed. I feel so mad,” she said.When approached by press outside the store on Wednesday, one member of management said “I don’t need the opportunity to comment on anything”.Secretary of the Trades Council, Frank McDonald, who was at the store to support the action, said he believes the 30 staff members are “completely justified” in their protest and that management are “totally ignoring employment legislation”.A letter issued to staff from Cappagrennan Limited, trading as Ivan’s, stated that the directors are currently considering the options available to the company.“In the event that any or all of the employees are made redundant, we have been advised that those employees will receive their full salary entitlements to include any/all arrears of pay and full statutory redundancy”, the letter added. TAGSCaherdavinivansMusic Limerickprotest #SaucySoul: Room 58 – ‘Hate To See You Leave’ Advertisement Watch the streamed gig for Fergal Nash album launchlast_img read more

POWER CUTS AS STORM HITS THE COUNTY

first_imgUPDATED: HUNDREDS of homes are without power this evening as a storm with high winds hit Co Donegal.Many other homes are running on reduced power.It followed an Orange Warning from Met Eireann where forecasters warned of wind gusts of up to 130km/hr. In the past half hour power has been cut to homes in the Ramelton and Milford areas.ESB says more than 2,500 homes are without power – and they hope to restore services by 9pm. POWER CUTS AS STORM HITS THE COUNTY was last modified: November 2nd, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Got That?  The Complex Story of African Mammal Evolution

first_imgThe article by Jean-Jacques Jaeger in the Dec. 4 issue of Nature1 is pretty upbeat about the evolutionary history of African mammals, but takes a bit of untangling to follow.    He begins confidently, “For some 40 million years, the Afro-Arabian landmass existed in splendid isolation.  A newly described fossil fauna from the end of that time provides a window on the evolution of the continent’s large mammals.”  (He refers to a fossil group named the Chilga biota, found in the Ethiopian highlands by Kappelman et al., described in the same issue.2)  Let’s take a look out said window and see how evolution has unfolded:During most of the Cenozoic era, from the Cretaceous�Tertiary boundary 65 million years ago until roughly 24 million years ago, Afro-Arabia was an island continent drifting steadily northwards towards Eurasia.  Fossil mammals documenting this period are scarce and belong almost exclusively to endemic forms restricted to Afro-Arabia, such as proboscideans, hyraxes and elephant-shrews.  But by around 24 million years ago, a permanent land bridge had formed between the two landmasses.  A burst of faunal interchange followed: many Eurasian mammals, such as rhinos and ruminants, dispersed into Africa, and some Afro-Arabian mammals, such as elephants, migrated in the opposite direction.  (Emphasis added in all quotations.)That forms the plot line, but there are problems.  The Chilga specimens he describes seem to fit the story, but there are puzzles among the bones:Among the proboscideans recorded are primitive forms such as Palaeomastodon and Phiomia (also known from older deposits in Egypt).  But there are also representatives of modern families, for example taxa such as Gomphotherium, the earliest proboscidean on the branch leading to extant elephants.  Another surprise is the oldest occurrence of deinotheres, peculiar proboscideans with downward-curved lower tusks, which were previously recorded only from rocks younger than 24 million years old.  The new species of deinothere displays molars that are more ‘bunodont’ in form (that is, made of several distinct cusplets arranged in transverse crests) than its descendant, whose molars display plain transverse crests.  This discovery seems to rule out the possibility that deinotheres are derived from an ancestor bearing plain, transverse-crested molars, as was formerly supposed, and provides new evidence about proboscidean evolution.Jaeger bemoans the scarcity of the fossil record for this period, but claims, “Nonetheless, considerable information has been inferred from the evidence we do have.”  He talks about how systematists have grouped the African fauna into a superorder Afrotheria based on fossil and molecular evidence.  Though “African mammalian faunas are dominated by these endemic forms,” a few other groups did get over to the big island somehow, including our alleged remote ancestors, the catarrhine primates, fathers of hominoids.  These “newcomers” went through “rapid evolution” on the landmass, he claims.    Even though the Chilga fossils are supposed to pre-date the land bridge, Jaeger says, “The Chilga mammals also yield insights into the dynamics of the faunal interchange between Afro-Arabia and Eurasia.”  How is that possible?  By seeing what pre-existed before the interchange, he feels it is possible to document that “the ensuing ecological competition ended with winners and losers.”  I.e., some animals were destined to fall in numbers, others to multiply and diversify.    The Chilga fossils do leave a few research items for paleontologists:Finally, the discoveries of Kappelman et al. highlight two other palaeobiological issues.  First, on northern continents glaciation caused a significant cooling around 33 million years ago, which resulted in numerous extinctions among mammalian communities.  From these new data, however, it seems that large Afro-Arabian herbivores were not affected, either at that time or later, implying that the climatic changes were less severe on southern continents.  Second, the fossil record of the Afro-Arabian continent is not only scanty but also largely concentrated on the northern edge.  This has led to the proposal that other groups of mammals existed in Afro-Arabia during its period of isolation, but that they were restricted to more southern latitudes.  However, the Chilga mammal community is rather like that found at Fayum in Egypt, which is some five million years older, providing hints that there was little provinciality among Afro-Arabian mammals at that time.  As yet, though, we have unveiled only a few of the secrets of mammal evolution on the Afro-Arabian continent.  Many more surprising discoveries are to be expected.Got that?1Jean-Jacques Jaeger, “Mammalian evolution: Isolationist tendencies,” Nature 426, 509 – 511 (04 December 2003); doi:10.1038/426509a.2Kappelman et al., “Oligocene mammals from Ethiopia and faunal exchange between Afro-Arabia and Eurasia,” Nature 426, 549 – 552 (04 December 2003); doi:10.1038/nature02102.Our policy before commenting on a paper is to approach it with an open mind as much as possible, and give the author the benefit of the doubt.  We give the author or authors their day in court, and begin with the premise innocent till proven guilty.  But we also want to see hard data that support any conclusions, and the conclusions must survive the Baloney Detector to be granted any credibility or respect.  Bluffing is a big turn-off.    With that in mind, not much survived in this paper.  Jaeger sounds very confident that evolutionists are very well on the way to understanding mammal evolution; it’s just a matter of time, cleaning up a few remaining puzzles.  His position is typical of evolutionists.  The story only makes sense to someone already convinced evolution is true.  The puzzles outnumber the confirmations, but since non-evolutionary alternatives are disallowed from the outset, no amount of negative data can ever falsify their claim that all animals have bacteria ancestors.    How Jaeger can keep from biting his fingernails at the sheer number of puzzles is the real puzzle.  With your critical, open-minded eye, consider his confessions of these non-evolutionary observations:The fossil record is scanty.Known fossils are restricted to isolated locales on the northern periphery of Africa.“Modern” representatives are mixed in with alleged “primitive” specimens, even though the Afrotheria were supposedly isolated from Europe and Asia for millions of years and had plenty of time and space to evolve all they wanted.The teeth of the deinotheres evolved from complex to simple, not the other way around.Some critters managed to get to Africa, while others remained isolated.  Was there some kind of discriminatory ferry system operating?After the land bridge formed, there were winners and losers, but no way to predict according to evolutionary theory who would win or lose.A long global ice age seemed to have no effect on the Afrotheria.There was little provinciality among African mammals (i.e., geographic isolation; the animals were free to roam widely), yet fossils are rare in the interior.    Anyone see evolution here?  From just a few bones, at a few locations on the northern edge of the huge continent of Africa, Jaeger proceeds to weave a magical mystery tale out of thin air (and hot, spinning air at that).  He daydreams about floating continents, selective weather, selective migrations, selective fossilizations, selective winners and losers, and land bridges that both increase and decrease the evolutionary adaptations of immigrants.  Almost every observation is counter to what was previously believed.  Nowhere does the reader see any hard evidence of transitional forms.  The only solid evidence points to are dead things; remnants of advanced, complex, large, healthy, well-adapted mammals.  The dates are part of the myth; they are made up, based on methods that depend for their validity on evolutionary assumptions and wild extrapolations into the unobservable past.    In a courtroom, the attorneys have the opportunity to give an opening statement.  These are usually overconfident claims that the facts of the case are going to prove their side.  But then, witnesses have to submit to cross-examination on matters of fact, and the attorneys are prevented from spin doctoring, asking leading questions, or going beyond the evidence.  Unfortunately, the news media often take the opening statement of the Darwinist lawyer at face value and parrot it uncritically to their readers.  Here at Creation-Evolution Headlines, we feel our readers deserve to watch a fair trial.  Jaeger is charged with five counts: doctoring evidence, manufacturing just-so stories, refusing to consider nonevolutionary alternatives, making inferences beyond what scientific caution would allow, and assuming what needs to be proved.  We have swept away the storytelling elements and stared at the evidence, and have reached our conclusion.  Guilty, your honor.    For more examples of evolutionary storytelling contrary to hard evidence, see these other recent headlines on supposed mammal evolution: 12/12/03 on marsupials, 11/17/03 on Smithsonian’s Mammal Hall, 10/30/03 on cave packrats, 10/13/03 on monkey color vision, 07/16/03 on development, 11/22/02 on dogs, 11/01/03 on placentas, 06/04/02 on tooth evolution, and especially 03/18/03, National Geographic’s embarrassing April 2003 cover story on “the rise of mammals,” and the PNAS hall of shame from 05/28/02.  For that matter, how about the next headline below? (Visited 19 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Early May planting dates better for soybeans

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ohio soybeans planted from May 1 through mid-May resulted in better yields, according to a study by researchers from Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center.In the study of 2013 and 2014 planting trials at OARDC’s Western Agricultural Research Station near South Charleston, Ohio, soybean yields decreased by 0.6 bushels per acre per day when planted after mid-May, according to Laura Lindsey, a soybean and small grains specialist with OSU Extension.Those yield results held true if the soil temperatures were 50 degrees or warmer, Lindsey said. However, soybeans planted too early when soil conditions were not adequate resulted in bean leaf beetle defoliation and frost damage.Canopy closure beneficial“There are some exceptions to a yield advantage when planting early, such as if the soils aren’t warm enough or if the fields are too wet,” she said. “In those cases, early planting can be detrimental to soybean yields. “The greatest benefit of planting May 1 to mid-May is canopy closure, which increases light interception, improves weed control by shading out weeds, and helps retain soil moisture.”In a recent posting in the college’s Crop Observation and Recommendation Network (C.O.R.N) newsletter, Lindsey said soybean growers need to consider planting conditions before heading to the field.“Soybean germination begins when soil temperatures reach 50 degrees and moisture is present at the planting depth of 1-1.5 inches,” she said. “With these conditions, emergence can typically be expected 2-3 weeks after planting.”Lindsey cautions growers not to plant early if the soil is excessively cold or wet.Timely planting critical“Slower germination and compaction can negate the benefits of the earlier planting date,” she said. “Timely planting is critical for maximizing yield in soybeans, but using good judgment on field conditions plays a role that is equally important to determining yield potential.”Seeding rates and row spacing are also important to consider to achieve optimum soybean yields, Lindsey said.Preliminary results of another two-year study of soybean seeding rates and row spacing show fields with between 100,000-140,000 plants per acre at harvest will result in yields that generally provide the maximum economic return, she said.“The study also found that soybeans planted at 7.5- and 15-inch row widths outyielded soybeans planted at 30-inch row widths,” Lindsey said. “Soybeans planted in the 30-inch rows yielded on average 15 to 20% lower than those planted in the narrower rows.”The study, which is funded by the Ohio Soybean Council, will also use data from this year’s growing season to compare to last year’s results, Lindsey said.last_img read more

Watch Guide: Championship Week

first_imgThe season is nearly over. We just have this week plus Army-Navy week and that’s it. It flew by didn’t it? Remember, we get Colorado-Washington tonight before the other four Power 5 title games tomorrow. All the bowl implications this weekend. I’m rooting for complete chaos for the committee. No outs.Thanks as always to Ryan Hartwig for his work all season.Weekend Watch Guide: Championship Week While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

Hoops Preview: Oklahoma State vs. TCU Round Two

first_imgDon’t look now, but the (17-8, 6-6) TCU Horned Frogs are looking like a tournament team for the first time since before Bill Clinton was impeached. Currently projecting as a 1o-seed, the Frogs are experiencing all the good feels after sweeping Texas recently for the first time since head coach Jamie Dixon was hitting game winners as a senior.Viewing InformationTime: 8:00 p.m.Location: Fort Worth, TexasTV: ESPNULine: TCU – 1Season TrendA solid resume that lacks signature wins but remains fairly unblemished as they’ve beat everyone they should have.Handed a season-high 18 point loss, the Frogs returned home dejected after trailing the vast majority of the game against the rival Baylor Bears on Saturday. The TCU offense was on life support, only scoring 17 points in the first half on only one assist. The biggest gap was on the boards where Baylor dominated, swiping 25 defensive boards and ruining second chance opportunities for the Frogs.Johnathan Motley dominated the TCU front court to the tune of 25 points on 12 of 15 shooting and Baylor’s spot-duty shooting guard King McClure had one of his best games of the year, hitting 3 of 4 from deep for 13 points. Baylor’s sleepy three point shooters hitting nearly 39 percent from deep bodes well for the Cowboy bombers on Wednesday night.The Last Time They PlayedSometimes you’re in the wrong place at the wrong time and Stillwater on January 23rd was just that for TCU. What turned out to be the second win in a five game streak, the Cowboys were putting everything together and picking up serious momentum that night. Jawun emerged from his slump like an angry bear out of hibernation, lighting up the Frogs for 27 points and assists. While TCU drew it close with ten minutes to go, the Pokes put their foot down per Coach Underwood:“The last 10 minutes of that ballgame is how you close out a game. (Shoot) 12 of 15 from the perimeter, you make your free throws and then no turnovers in the last eight and a half (minutes) or so.”TCU’s talent-rich front line was hit and miss, disappearing for stretches. The skilled 6’11” Slovakian had a phenomenal second half but it just wasn’t enough to overcome the Cowboy offense shooting 64.5 percent from the field after the break.To cap off the night, Dillard put the Frogs to bed with this beauty:Davon Dillard windmills the Horned Frogs. #okstate pic.twitter.com/A53pjIy5xg— Carson Cunningham (@KOCOCarson) January 24, 2017Three Things to Watch1. As Fisher Goes, They GoThe top-rated recruit in Horned Frog basketball history is freshman point guard Jaylen Fisher and he will be the swing vote if this TCU team is to go dancing. While his career-high 18 points wasn’t enough to keep TCU in the game against Baylor on Saturday, it usually is. When the freshman guard gets into double digits, the Frogs are 12-3 and he’s got a four game streak in double digits. Rationality says that the team’s two leading scorers (star big man Brodziansky and Texas A&M transfer Alex Robinson) need to get their numbers for the team to be successful, but it’s a prolific third banana that helps the TCU offense to get over the hump.2. Get after the BallQuoted after the Texas game in early February, head coach Jamie Dixon laid out a crucial point for the TCU offense:“Our guards are going to have some turnovers because we let them do a lot of things. We rely on them to create shots for a lot of guys. So we’re going to have to play through the mistakes. For the most part, we haven’t had them [the last two games].”So much of TCU’s offensive efficiency depends on the newbie guards not turning the ball over. A week ago, the Red Raiders were able to take the game into the final seconds by turning over the Frogs 21 times in Fort Worth.Highlights from tonight’s game at TCU, Red Raiders face No. 3 Kansas at 1 p.m. on Saturday #WreckEm #4to1 pic.twitter.com/Prrr6XO5TB— Texas Tech Basketball (@TexasTechMBB) February 8, 20173. Double the Big GuyI won’t ask for anything for Christmas ever again if I don’t have to watch another big play keep-a-way from Dillard/McGriff/Hammonds again this year. Fortunately for the Pokes, Texas Tech last week exposed a vulnerability in junior forward Vlad Brodziansky’s offense: double him fast and he coughs it up on the pass.Now, the dude shoots quick so you’ve got to collapse quickly. But go ahead and forget about the TCU deep ball at 34 percent, it’s a much better shot than the 59.6 percent-shooting Brodziansky.Fun side note: of course we looked at but didn’t offer the skilled 6’11” big man at a Kansas junior college… you throw Brodziansky in a class with Evans and Dillard, you’ve got a potential all-timer.Statistical ComparisonOther NotesThe road Cowboys have taken their last three Big 12 road games, including an 82-75 victory at No. 7 West Virginia. In the Big 12, only Kansas (7-1) has more true road wins than the Cowboys (5-4).OSU was 2-3 against new TCU head coach Jamie Dixon in his time at Pitt. Most notable was when new OSU coach Travis Ford’s team was eliminated by the Panthers from the 2009 NCAA Tournament.Since TCU joined the Big 12, OSU is 7-2 against the Horned Frogs, and both losses came in the Cowboys’ last two trips to Fort Worth.The last team to make the NCAA Tournament field after falling in their first six conference games was the 1985-86 Maryland team led by Len Bias.Seven OSU players went to high school within an hour drive of TCU’s campus; Brandon Averette (Richardson), Jawun Evans (Dallas), Tavarius Shine (Irving), Cameron McGriff (Grand Prairie), Phil Forte (Flower Mound), Leyton Hammonds (North Richland Hills) and Jeffrey Carroll (Rowlett).Davon Dillard entered Big 12 play on Dec. 30 with a career total of 63 minutes played (39 this season).  Over the last six games Dillard is averaging 8.8 points, 4.8 rebounds and 56.3 percent shooting, including a 62.5 percent clip from 3-point.center_img While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

Details on the 2017 Oklahoma State Spring Game

first_imgOklahoma State will play its 2017 Spring Game on Saturday, April 15 at 1 p.m. in Stillwater. The format will be 10-minute quarters on Saturday without a running clock. Everyone will get plenty of playing time, but if you want to catch Mason Rudolph, get there early as he’s only expected to play a couple of series.The Spring Game day in Stillwater is always a fun, familial atmosphere with the Remember the 10 Run that morning at 9 a.m. and the fact that you can go on the field afterwards to visit and take photos with players.There will also be inflatables and face painting on the south side of the stadium for the kids (or adults, I suppose) from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. Just wrapped up our last practice before Saturday’s Spring Game at 1 p.m. Gates open at noon with free parking and free admission! #okstate pic.twitter.com/7Gm1q4fvcF— Cowboy Football (@CowboyFB) April 13, 2017The game will not be televised but PFB will have a reporter and a photographer in attendance so we will have full coverage of the festivities on Saturday afternoon.It should be a fun one — Vegas has set the over/under for layers of bubble wrap covering QB1 is 97.5. I’ll take the over.It’s coming to BPS! Let’s get it!! #GoPokes #okstate #CowboyUp18 pic.twitter.com/VIhY4WFUYT— Cowboy FB Recruiting (@CowboyFB_Elite) April 11, 2017 While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

Big Board: Oklahoma State’s Targets at QB for 2019

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. In the spirit of NFL Draft week, our big board series listing OSU’s top recruiting targets — which began Sunday with its targets at running back — continues today with a look at the quarterback position.Quarterback is arguably the most important position in a recruiting class and it is one OSU has had great success with. Outside of Keondre Wudtee, who committed on national signing day a year ago, OSU has landed and held early commitments in recent history under Michael Yurcich, other than Nick Starkel.Jelani Woods was an early pledge last season, and Spencer Sanders, ESPN’s top QB in Texas, was OSU’s first commitment of the 2018 class.Spencer Sanders is very, very good. He tore his ACL at the end of his junior season, but make no mistake, OSU is all in on him being the future signal caller in Stillwater. So OSU isn’t worried about the position for 2018 and can instead shift its focus to 2019. Here is who OSU is targeting along with two names to keep on the radar.Grant Gunnell — 6-foot-5 — Houston, TexasGunnell isn’t just a hot commodity in the region, he’s one of the most wanted gunslingers in America. Rated as the No. 2 quarterback in the 2019 class nationally, Gunnell is a pro-style quarterback who can sit back and dissect defenses from the pocket with a similar style of Mason Rudolph.Gunnell has visited Stillwater on numerous occasions, and runs a similar style offense at St. Piux X — a wide open spread offense — that OSU runs. He’s target No. 1 for Mike Yurcich, who has been one of the best quarterback recruiters over the last few years. Bo Nix — 6-foot-1.5 — Pinson, AlabamaThe very first thing that pops to you about Nix has nothing to do with his production, but rather his pedigree. Nix is the son of former Auburn quarterback Patrick Nix, who is highly regarded in Alabama circles. To that end, Nix is a heavy Auburn lean. And because Auburn has had him on the radar for so long, they were one of the first to jump in on him in his recruitment.Nix, unlike Gunnell, is a dual-threat option who is equally as productive with his arm as his legs. As a sophomore in 2016-17, Nix not only started for the varsity team. He racked up 1,737 yards through the air and 17 touchdowns with a 55.2 percent completion percentage, according to MaxPreps. He also averaged 10 yards per carry on his way to a 1,300 yard rushing season, adding 20 touchdowns on the ground.There’s a reason Auburn, Florida State, Oklahoma, LSU, Alabama and Georgia, among others, have already extended offers. He’s a top-150 recruit for a reason, and could fit OSU’s offense well with his versatile skill set.center_img Grant Tisdale — 6-foot-1 — Allen, TexasWithout question, OSU’s big board is in order listed above. If Gunnell facetimed Gundy (which he’s done a time or two) and said he was ready to commit, OSU would be rejoicing with arms wide open.#GoPokes pic.twitter.com/nyPKJQHCPT— Grant Gunnell (@grantgunnell7) March 29, 2017But another Grant, whose last name is Tisdale, could be a name worth watching. The 6-foot-1 dual-threat prospect quarterbacks the Texas powerhouse Allen Eagles, and although he’s been somewhat of a late riser on the recruiting trail he could be a major prospect in the future. He has garnered offers from SMU, Texas Tech, Mississippi State and Indiana State to this point. And because he slings the rock for Allen, he’s a lock to get more attention in his upcoming junior season.Tisdale has already made a visit to Stillwater and, despite not receiving an offer (in part because of OSU’s standing offers to Gunnell and Nix, whose recruitment is still open), the opportunity for an offer isn’t out of the question in the future. He fits the profile of a dual-threat quarterback with good mechanics who could fit OSU’s system, comparable to Keondre Wudtee and Spencer Sanders.last_img read more

Chalk Talk: Three Things to Take Away From the Spring Game

first_imgThe Oklahoma State spring game gave a glimpse of OSU fans what they could see in the upcoming 2017 season. Although the game plans of most spring scrimmages are fairly conservative, only using a handful of base plays, there were still some notable things that one might have noticed during the game. Here are three most noteworthy play observations in the Spring Game.Three Down/Four DownThe OSU defense has committed to using a more varied personnel in 2017. The Cowboys used some three-down fronts last season, and the recent hiring of Brian VanGorder has solidified their commitment to three-down sets. The Cowboys have clearly worked on three-down formations in the offseason. They used a nickel set on multiple occasions with the rush backer on the left side taking place of the end (most defenses will put their best pass rusher on the quarterback’s blind side).They also used a nickel set with two rush backers on each side and three lineman spaced between.This is a good sign for Cowboy fans. Last season, they used three-down sets conservatively, bringing it out in likely pass situations. There was little variety, but it makes sense considering they started using it mid-season. Now, they’ve added variety, and it’s not just for prevent situations anymore. Expect three-down sets to play a bigger role in the Cowboy defense next season.Y AlignmentA number of Cowboy fans thought that the OSU offense would minimize the cowboy back position in 2017 considering how many talented receivers they have. If the Spring Game was any indication, it’s not necessarily that the Cowboys aren’t using the cowboy back anymore.Rather, they’re adding more variation to the back’s alignment. The Orange team, for example, lined cowboy back Keenan Brown all over the field, often playing in the backfield, as a tight end and as a flexed receiver all in the same drive. The Black team did the same with Dawson Bassett on the first couple of drives.The Cowboys showed formations with the tight end flexed in the slot in both two-by-two and trips formations; in the latter, the cowboy back aligned on the line of scrimmage in both the inside slot, known as “trey” alignment, and in the outside slot, known as a “trio” alignment (terminology varies).When used correctly, flexed tight ends can be a headache to cover. If the strong-side linebacker plays the flexed end head up, then he leaves the box susceptible to the run. But if he stays in the box, then he has to leave the end uncovered before the snap which gives the offense an advantage in the passing game.If done correctly, this formational versatility should give opposing defenses headaches throughout the upcoming season, especially considering how quickly the Cowboys operate. Four-receiver sets are effective, but the use of a tight end in this fashion has its advantages as well.QB Run GameThe Cowboys’ run game looked slightly different than last season’s in the spring game. It almost appeared as if they reverted back to their 2015 ways. They put a big focus on the outside zone out of the shotgun, with no use of the pistol (which, as we’ve talked about before, allows backs to utilize their vision better in comparison to the shotgun).They used inside runs with a wing tight end, but there weren’t any available running lanes because of the extra linebacker in the box due to the tight end’s presence. Their only successful play was an inside zone read. Mason Rudolph converted a 4th-and-1 with it in the game’s first drive, and the play was used in the latter half of the game to open up holes up the middle for the running backs.This play is an example of something the Cowboys never do enough of, and that’s to run against a six-man box. Yes, cowboy backs can help in the run game, but they can also help spread a defense out as well. This play also signifies the possibility of using Mason Rudolph in the run game more in 2017. Could we see more plays like this? That’s currently unclear, but the Cowboys consistently used this play throughout all four quarters.The Spring Game in its entirety was fairly lackluster, as OSU fans should come to expect. Gundy isn’t one to show too much before the season starts, and rightfully so. Although the scrimmage itself wasn’t all that special, the game was telling of what we could see in the future. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

Mike Gundy Named to Dodd Trophy Watch List

first_imgPaul JohnsonGeorgia Tech David ShawStanford Dabo SwinneyClemson Ken NiumataloloNavy Paul ChrystWisconsin Clay HeltonUSC Mark RichtMiami James FranklinPenn State While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. Jim McElwainFlorida Gus MalzahnAuburn Kyle WhittinghamUtahcenter_img Urban MeyerOhio State Butch JonesTennessee Mike GundyOklahoma State Watch out. Or at least, be on the watch. For watch lists.In all seriousness, Mike Gundy is the next Cowboy to be included on a preseason watch list. The 13th-year head coach was included as a candidate for the Bobby Dodd Trophy, an award given to the nation’s top college football coach as chosen by a selection committee, with a focus on both on-the-field and off-the-field success.According to the foundation, the award “honors the coach of a team with a successful season on the field and equally as important, stresses the importance of academic excellence and desire to give back to the community.”Mike Gundy’s on-field success is well-documented. At 104-50, he’s the winningest coach in Oklahoma State history and that’s allowed him to be the tenured as a veteran head man in Stillwater.AdChoices广告“As I look back over the year, the season, not only on the field, but our team GPA was a 2.9 this last semester,” he said at Big 12 media days. “Our young people are volunteering time in the community. It’s just a culture that’s something that maybe I didn’t even expect we could create at Oklahoma State.”Former winners include Nick Saban, Dabo Swinney, Chris Peterson and fellow Big 12 coaches Bill Snyder (twice) and Gary Patterson.Here’s a look at this year’s candidates.2017 Dodd Trophy Preseason Watch List Nick SabanAlabama CoachTeam Bill SnyderKansas State Chris PetersenWashington Justin FuenteVirginia Tech Jim HarbaughMichiganlast_img read more