Recruitment: The Candidate Opt-out

first_img Anyone who has spent a reasonable amount of time in the HR/recruiting industry invariably will have been on the wrong end of candidate opting out of an application process. There are of course a multitude of reasons why this might happen, a lot of which are outside of our control, but sadly in a large amount of cases, accountability rests on the shoulders of the agent/HR pro and in a lot of cases this can have significant ramifications. For example, in agency-land the client can quickly lose faith in an agent’s ability to close the recruitment loop. In internal talent acquisition you will be held accountable for the cost associated with the time spent resulting in a no-hire etc. Not to mention the pounding your reputation could take from the candidate or client perspective if it a regular occurrence. Sadly in HR and recruitment the candidate opt-out is an evil that will always play a part in our role but if we ensure adequate focus on the quality of our communication and efficiency of our processes, the risk will be largely minimized. It’s not rocket science by any means, but it’s good to not lose sight of the basics as our experience grows.Clarity is King: Grey areas are the mortal enemy of any recruiter. When talking to a candidate, the more details that go undiscussed or the more inaccurate the information you give the applicant, the higher the no-hire’o’meter will rise. When talking to a candidate, if you get the impression that any details you’ve divulged about the remit, remuneration package, location or pertinent skills managed to raise the candidate’s eyebrows and perhaps caused un-easiness, DRILL DOWN!. Don’t be happy with getting a half-hearted approval to flick a CV to a client/hiring manager. Ultimately all you will be doing is facilitating the beginning of a fact finding mission for the candidate (which they will opt out of as soon as any facts they don’t like arise) as opposed to offering up all the facts and ascertaining that they are your/clients next superstar. Yes, your CV submittal rate will be higher but your conversion rate will stink.Recruit in a timely manner, without lacking substance. Anyone who has read my previous blog post (Why the long……process) will know my thoughts on drawn out, lengthy recruitment processes. IMO, if a recruiter or HR pro must ask a candidate to go through a 6 stage process in order for them to ascertain suitability, or if they lack the ability to consult properly with their clients/hiring managers around why this is not needed, then there is some serious training required. Personally, I’m a fan of a robust phone screening process followed by a panel interview or a well put together 2 stage interview process. Keeping in mind the candidate experience, neither option would be arduous but will give more than adequate time to ensure a full screening process.As I said, by no means rocket science but I’d suggest just keeping these two things in mind will largely contribute to overall recruitment success rate and conversion ratios. Read full article Recruitment: The Candidate Opt-outShared from missc on 14 Apr 2015 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Articlecenter_img Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed.last_img read more

Arlington National Cemetery Chosen as Final Resting Place for USS Monitor Sailors

first_img View post tag: National View post tag: Naval View post tag: News by topic View post tag: place View post tag: Monitor View post tag: usa Back to overview,Home naval-today Arlington National Cemetery Chosen as Final Resting Place for USS Monitor Sailors View post tag: sailors Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced Feb. 12 that remains recovered from the USS Monitor will be interred in Arlington National Cemetery.A ceremony will be held March 8 to honor the two unknown Sailors.The specific date of the interment was chosen to honor Monitor’s role in the Battle of Hampton Roads 151 years ago. “These may very well be the last Navy personnel from the Civil War to be buried at Arlington,” said Mabus. “It’s important we honor these brave men and all they represent as we reflect upon the significant role Monitor and her crew had in setting the course for our modern Navy.”The Brooklyn-built Monitor, the nation’s first ironclad warship, made nautical history after being designed and assembled in 118 days. Commissioned Feb. 25, 1862, the Monitor fought in the first battle between two ironclads when it engaged CSS Virginia in the Battle of Hampton Roads March 9, 1862. The battle marked the first time iron-armored ships clashed in naval warfare and signaled the end of the era of wooden ships.Though the Monitor’s confrontation with the Virginia ended in a draw, the Monitor prevented the Virginia from gaining control of Hampton Roads and thus preserved the Federal blockade of the Norfolk-area.Months later, 16 Sailors were lost when the Monitor sank Dec. 31, 1862 in a storm off Cape Hatteras, N.C. Her wreck was discovered in 1974 was designated the nation’s first national marine sanctuary, managed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).Starting in 1998, the Navy, NOAA and the Mariner’s Museum in Newport News, Va., began working together to recover artifacts from Monitor.During the summer of 2002, while attempting to recover the ship’s 150-ton gun turret, Navy divers discovered human remains inside the turret. The remains were transported to Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) in Hawaii for possible identification.JPAC, with the assistance of the Navy Casualty Office and NOAA, conducted a comprehensive effort to identify the remains of the unknown Sailors, to include time-demanding and detailed genealogical research. Given the age of the remains, efforts to identify them were unsuccessful. However, JPAC was able to narrow down possible descendents of the unknown Sailors to 30 family members from 10 different families. “The decision to lay these heroes to rest in Arlington, honors not only these two men but all those who died the night Monitor sank and reminds us, that the sacrifices made a hundred and fifty years ago, will never be forgotten by this nation”, said David Alberg, Superintendent of NOAA’s Monitor National Marine Sanctuary.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, February 13, 2013; Image: US Navy View post tag: Arlington View post tag: Finalcenter_img Share this article View post tag: Navy Authorities Arlington National Cemetery Chosen as Final Resting Place for USS Monitor Sailors View post tag: Resting View post tag: Chosen February 13, 2013 View post tag: USS View post tag: Cemeterylast_img read more

Donald Sterling’s wife says she will attempt to maintain ownership of the Los Angeles Clippers

first_imgLOS ANGELES – Los Angeles Clippers co-owner Shelly Sterling said in remarks published today that she believes she is legally entitled to maintain ownership of the team and will attempt to do so even as the NBA pushes to remove her husband from the team he has owned for 33 years.Sterling, in remarks reported in the Los Angeles Times, described her long tenure as a “die-hard” fan of the Clippers and said she believes the sanctions against Donald Sterling, including a lifetime ban and $2.5 million fine, do not apply to “me or my family.”Shelly Sterling’s position presents a “wild card” for the pro basketball league as it faces its biggest crisis in memory, a league official who declined to be named told The Times. Her intention to hold on to the team is a wrinkle apparently not contemplated by NBA officials when they moved ten days ago to strip her estranged husband of ownership.The league moved against Donald Sterling after the website TMZ released a recording in which Sterling told a frequent courtside companion that he did not want to see her at Clippers games with black people. NBA Commissioner Adam Silver responded with the fine, lifetime ban and call for the league’s 29 other owners to vote to force Sterling to sell the team. Players, fans and other owners have signaled they would like to see a fresh start for the Los Angeles franchise, according to The Times. Broadcaster Ralph Lawler, the Clippers’ longest-serving employee, told the newspaper that Shelly Sterling’s plan to keep the team was understandable but that others in the organization were ready to move on.“I think in the eyes of the players and the coaching staff and the basketball staff, the page has been turned, and I think it would be difficult to turn it back,” Lawler said. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more